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#IGCommodityChat: Base Metals

JamesIG

Exploring base metal markets

Join us on Thursday 6th December at 1pm for the final #IGCommodityChat, when we will be talking to economist Daniel Lacalle and mining analyst John Meyer about base metal markets. Put your questions to the experts as part of the live Q&A by using #IGCommodityChat using the comments section below. 
 

Submit your questions now

There will be a live Q&A during the session, so you can put forward any topics you want answered. Post your questions to the #IGCommodityChat using the comments section below, and check out one of the latest #IGChats we recently posted on oil and gold to get a flavour of what to expect. The show will be broadcast live from within the dealing platform as well as via a special YouTube link and on various social channels. 

  • How political unrest impacts base metal supply
  • What the effect of the US-China trade war has been on base metal prices
  • How global growth (or a lack thereof) is impacting global demand
  • The base metal mining stocks to watch


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Guest Dr Copper Popper

Posted

Is copper as good a 'bellwether indicator' as so many people have said in the past? To me is seems geo-political tensions push indices about, AS WELL AS metals. Nothing shows them being indicators, simply causal to macroeconomic events. 

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I read that 3 and 5 year bonds have 'inverted', which might be taken as a warning indicator of a recession.  Are there any correlating indicators in the Base Metal Market, either now, or might be looked for in the near future that will serve as confirmation?

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Which commodities in the overall Base Metal Markets do you think will do better in 2019?

Which commodities will be hardest hit if China and the USA cannot agree trading terms?

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Guest Znspread

Posted

What do you atribute  the current tightness (backwardation) in the zinc spreads too, physical or speculative activity? Basis that what impact do you think this will have on outright prices as we roll through that period.

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"Palladium is more valuable than gold for the first time since 2002, with prices soaring by around 50 percent in less than four months to record levels" - it looks like this is on the back of  emissions-reducing catalysts for vehicles. Is this trend likely to continue or will supply catch up to demand?

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