Jump to content

New Client Trading Questions

Sign in to follow this  
If you have any questions about placing your first trade in a Live or Demo account, ask here. Talk about strategy, market movers and risk management.

83 topics in this forum

    • 29 replies
    • 2,106 views
  1. Placing your first trade

    • 21 replies
    • 2,460 views
    • 12 replies
    • 435 views
  2. Filling in your deal ticket

    • 8 replies
    • 2,172 views
    • 7 replies
    • 1,569 views
    • 6 replies
    • 181 views
  3. Conversion difference?

    • 6 replies
    • 487 views
    • 5 replies
    • 467 views
    • 5 replies
    • 749 views
    • 5 replies
    • 1,219 views
    • 5 replies
    • 334 views
    • 5 replies
    • 337 views
  4. MT4 spread betting

    • 5 replies
    • 331 views
    • 5 replies
    • 494 views
  5. Binaries

    • 5 replies
    • 688 views
    • 4 replies
    • 127 views
  6. What time do Fx open on Sunday?

    • 4 replies
    • 297 views
  7. Leverage/Funds/Margin/Availability

    • 4 replies
    • 147 views
    • 4 replies
    • 929 views
  8. wedge and technical analysis

    • 4 replies
    • 265 views
  9. Placing an Order

    • 3 replies
    • 307 views
  10. Overnight Interest

    • 3 replies
    • 581 views
    • 3 replies
    • 538 views
  11. ESMA regulation

    • 3 replies
    • 196 views
    • 3 replies
    • 1,390 views
    • 3 replies
    • 291 views
    • 2 replies
    • 418 views
    • 2 replies
    • 378 views
  12. Azj chart candle not updating

    • 2 replies
    • 302 views
  13. Issues with app

    • 2 replies
    • 91 views
Sign in to follow this  
  • Our picks

    • APAC brief 19 Mar
      Markets trade thin ahead of central bank risks: It’s said that money makes the world go around. And given central bankers control the money of the world, it is they who decide when the turning starts and stops. Described this way, central bankers role in the economy sounds Bond-villain-esque. That’s entirely unfair of course – only fringe-dwellers would suggest they are so malevolent. But recent history, based on experiential evidence, suggests that when it comes to financial markets, the actions of central bankers take primacy over all other considerations. This phenomenon must be a transient thing – a part of some other historical process. All high priests eventually lose their power. For now, though, it feels the age of the central-banker has reached its epoch, with markets dutifully obeying their rule.

      Markets pace the margins: The reason for the foregoing expatiation is that financial markets, owing to a dearth of economic and corporate data, have traded quietly in anticipation of several key central bank meetings this week. Naturally, the biggest of them all is Thursday morning’s US Federal Reserve meeting. In preparation for the event, traders are pacing the markets’ fringes. Risk appetite on Wall Street is still rather well supported. Volumes are below average but having broken key-resistance at 2815 on Friday, the clearing of that technical level has invited in some buyers. Rates markets are largely unchanged, although US bond yields have ticked slightly higher across the board, while the US Dollar is relatively steady, albeit well off its recent highs.
      • 0 replies
    • Flowless rally - APAC brief 18 Mar
      A flowless rally: It’s being dubbed the “flowless rally”. Equities are ticking higher, but without the fundamental buying-support one might assume. This is especially so when considering the milestone achieved on Wall Street on Friday. Finally, the 2815 resistance level has tumbled, and the bulls have cautiously, quietly rejoiced. There are yellow flags popping up here and there, however, and that is making participants wary. It goes back to this “flowless rally” business: the latest leg of global stocks big recovery isn’t being supported by investor flows. In fact, investor flows look to have diminished somewhat. The reasoning behind this move is somewhat speculative. The impact of share buybacks is one popular argument. Whatever the cause, confidence isn’t accompanying this rally.


      Economic conditions deteriorating: Maybe market participants are still scorned from the market correction in 2018. A bitterness and cynicism stemming from that is understandable. Much of the frustration comes, it would seem, from a widespread recognition that this rally has come in the absence of solid fundamentals. On the contrary, if looking at the macro-outlook, there are more reasons to be bearish than bullish right now. Global growth is (almost) irrefutably slowing, and some of the geopolitical sore-points dictating sentiment, like Brexit and the US-China trade war, are showing little new signs of progress. A major factor keeping this rally alive in riskier assets, perhaps concerningly, is a little case of “fear of missing out”.
      • 0 replies
    • MP's Vote To Extend Article 50 As The Brexit Saga Continues - EMEA Brief 15 March


      • 0 replies
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Topics
      6,374
    • Total Posts
      28,304
    • Total Members
      37,124
    Newest Member
    MRZEEEEEE
    Joined 19/03/19 10:00
×