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Daylight saving times - Changes to opening hours from 28 October

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UK and European clocks go back one hour when Daylight Saving Time (DST) ends on Sunday 28 October. From this date until Sunday 4 November, the end of DST in the United States, there are a number of changes to our opening hours:

  • US and Canadian markets will trade one hour earlier in UK time. For example, US and Canadian shares will be quoted between 1.30pm and 8pm
  • All forex markets will open at 9pm on Sunday 28 October and close at 9pm on Friday 2 November
  • 24-hour dealing on indices will open at 10pm on Sunday 28 October and close at 9pm on Friday 2 November
  • US shares (all sessions) will run from 8am to midnight Monday to Thursday, and from 8am to 9pm on Friday 2 November
  • Weekend trading on indices will open at the same time (4am Saturday), but will close one hour earlier (9.40pm Sunday)

The dealing desk will also close early at 9pm on Friday 2 November.

From Sunday 4 November, the above will revert to their usual hours.

Please also bear the following in mind:

Asian markets, which do not observe DST, will trade one hour earlier in UK time than previously. For example, Hong Kong shares will close at 8am.

Australian markets - Clients trading Australian markets should be aware that Australian clocks went forward by one hour earlier this month (two hours relative to UK clocks from 28 October).

Please note, all times listed here are UK time. We have tried to make this information as accurate as possible, but it is intended for guidance only and is subject to change.
 

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