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Newbie: Market Denominations


DavidHK

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Good day everyone,

I am new to trading and would like to get some clarification on how to read share prices in different markets.

1. For companies listed on the FTSE100 are these quoted in pounds? For example, if a company is listed as 56.18 does this mean £0.5618p per share? 
2. For US listed companies is this listed in dollars? For example, if a company is listed as 3855 does this mean $38.55?
3. For other markets, eg Japan 225, German 30, France 40 how are these listed?

I tried to find this information but could not and would be so grateful for any information provided.

Thanks.

 

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Hi @DavidHK,  you will need to check the web site of the  particular exchange the stock is traded on to find how it is listed.

The LSE lists in pence while the Nasdaq and NYSE lists in US Dollars but the broker quote on a platform may break that down even more, 

eg Tesla on the SB platform is 32000.00 which is $320.0000.

Barclays on the SB platform is 172.00 which is £1.7200

 

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Hi I have just had the same question. 

Two things I did to help me.

  1. Pretend to place an order - that came up with the currency involved - for example Amazon Inc at approx 1700 was $1700, c.£1300...
  2. Click on the Down Arrow next to the company (its one of the 3/4 icons), there is an option called Get info. Here has lots of useful things to help.

Hope this helps too.

  • Thanks 1
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2 hours ago, Bates said:

Hi I have just had the same question. 

Two things I did to help me.

  1. Pretend to place an order - that came up with the currency involved - for example Amazon Inc at approx 1700 was $1700, c.£1300...
  2. Click on the Down Arrow next to the company (its one of the 3/4 icons), there is an option called Get info. Here has lots of useful things to help.

Hope this helps too.

Hi Bates,

Thanks very much. But does that tell me the denomination? For example if I take Barclays PLC as an example currently trading at 172.06. The 'Get Info' tab says GBP so does this mean each share is £172 or £1.72p?

Thanks for your help

 

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By no means am an expert... being a newbie myself...

But number 1 if you place order for 1 share, it the IG app then tells you the price. The other poster (@caseynotes) is probably a another good approach if you want to make absolutely sure (i.e. look on the exchange websit) 

 

I think the LSE quotes in pence though. So 1 share above would be 1.72 ps... don’t forget that IG will add there commission to that figure so for me at the moment i1 share shows as £9.72

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Hi @DavidHK , @Bates is correct the London Stock Exchange quote in pence (US exchanges quote in $US) plus there is the commission per trade.

So eg for BARC IG lists it as 172.00 (broadly in line with the LSE) so the actual price for 1 share is 172 pence or £1.72.

There is a good stock guide for the new here;

https://www.liberatedstocktrader.com/stock-price/

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Just seen the entire IG web site seems to have gone through an upgrade so can't find anything any more.

Realised I was not clear previously. barc at 172.00 is 1£ and 72 pence and 0 tenths of 1 pence and 0 hundredths of 1 pence (which is 1 IG point). 

 

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