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MT4 (not responding)

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I thought to put together a self-help pack on solutions for the above problem. Though rare a non responding platform can be a real headache and is usually caused by one of 2 main problems. The first is the addition of a custom indicator that is not compatible with the build version of MT4 you are running or it may be that the indicator does not have a history look back limit and so the platform is trying to read too much. The second main cause is a build up of history over a long period of time that has to be read by the platform on each and every start up slowing down the platform over time and eventually leading to the 'not responding' notice.

We want to try to avoid a complete uninstall and reinstall and losing all our personal data, indicators and charts.

3 key points first;

1/ Make sure you have Templates made for your favourite chart layouts.

2/ Make sure you have a Profile saved of your complete MT4 setup.

3/ Have a copy of the Profile (click save profile again and give it a different name - My Profile 2. eg) This means that if you need to delete the whole profile from outside of the platform to get rid of the offending indicator you still have a backup copy. 

 

 The first link covers Lagging, Freezes, Slowdowns, Chart lagging, Slow execution of orders, and how to optimise the platform.

https://admiralmarkets.com/education/articles/trading-software/how-to-optimise-the-mt4-platform

The second link is a video on how to delete the offending charts or profile from outside the platform using your computer's Task Manager.

The second video also looks at how to resolve a sluggish platform and performance optimisation.

 

 

 

 

 
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