Jump to content

Our Picks

Top content from across the community, hand-picked by us.

Facebook Earnings "LIKED" by Shareholders - EMEA Brief 31 Jan
Facebook shares soared 12% after Earnings report of $2.38 per share crushed $2.19 expectation. Facebook's revenue forecast of $16.39 billion was also outdone coming it at a reported $16.91 billion
  • 0 replies
Brexit Amendments and Apple Earnings - EMEA Brief 30 Jan
MP’s have voted to remove the Irish backstop and remove the possibility of a No-Deal Brexit in the latest round of Commons voting.

  • 0 replies
Apple earnings release 29 Jan
As Apple is set to release earnings tonight, it will be the first quarter that investors do not have sales reports on individual products before the release. This is because the company announced that it would not be delivering specific figures for iPhone, iPad and Mac sales for the quarter as they believe the number of iPhone sales “isn’t a representative of the underlying strength of our business” and that “a unit of sale is less relevant for us today than it was in the past, given the breadth of our portfolio and the wider sales price dispersion within any given product line.”

But we all know that when a company has sold a lot, they want to let the world know how well they have done, as said by Steve jobs himself “if a company is selling a lot of stuff, they want people to know about it. If they aren’t, then they don’t”. On top of that, it is no secret that iPhone sales were short of estimates in the previous quarter. Nevertheless, as the average price of an iPhone has increased, Apple’s profits are still being driven higher.

This leaves a wary sentiment about Apple’s earnings release. With a slowdown in sales offset by higher sale prices, and a general feeling that economies are slowing down growth, Apple’s Q4 earnings release is marked by the pre-announcement issued on Jan 2 where Apple reported it had missed expectations for the year due to a slowdown in sales in China.

As Apple shares suffered the weight of the slowdown and the subsequent downgrade from firms like Bank of America, could a lower expectation on the back of the Jan 2nd announcement mean that Apple can beat expectations?

Find out what founder and CEO of Pocket Lint Stuart Miles has to say about Apple’s earnings forecast as he is interviewed by IGTV presenter Victoria Scholar.

 

As always, leave your comments and ideas below!
  • 3 replies
UK MPs hold their own 'Super Tuesday' - EMEA Brief 29 Jan
As MPs prepare to vote on amendments to the Brexit Plan, Theresa May has set the 13th of Feb as the date to hold a second round of voting on her Brexit deal.

  • 1 reply
FTSE100 Out of sync with other indices?
"While there is some divergence between the major indices in general recently the FTSE100 seems to have been much more reluctant to rally.  I don't see this as a material divergence however but merely a delay and maybe we will soon get a catch up rally on the FTSE?"
  • 16 replies
Post in Some simple and basic 'Fundamental Analysis'
Well the US Government has ended albeit temporarily the shutdown. The markets which were expected to sharply fall have risen phenomenally, especially the US indices. I tried to short the US indices and clearly got the trades wrong. Right now based on price action one should be trading long as one should never go against the trend regardless of fundamentals, economics, news, etc.
U.S. Government Shutdown Ends After 35 Days - EMEA Brief 28 Jan
The 35 day partial US government shutdown has ended after Trump conceded his demand for $5.7 billion to build his border wall as a condition for reopening the government. The temporary measure will fund the government for three weeks while Congress try to craft an immigration deal that pleases the president. 


  • 0 replies
Post in Econ Calendar
We are looking at bringing the Economic Calendar into the dealing platform and improving things such as alerts and automatic notifications. Now is your chance to have your say and help build out functions within the dealing platform.
    • Like
Wake up and smell the coffee; Starbucks beats sales expectations - EMEA Brief 25 Jan
Coffee giant Starbucks announced that same-stores sales grew by 4% in its home US market, with overall revenue also beating expectations. Speaking about the results, CEO Kevin Johnson said that "Our streamline efforts over the past six quarters are paying off by allowing us to bring more focus and discipline to our three strategic priorities".
    • Like
  • 1 reply
Mixed results - APAC brief 25 Jan
Sentiment weaker; but ASX to rise: SPI Futures are indicating an 11-point gain at the outset for the ASX200 this morning. It's perhaps a surprising result, given overnight activity. The chorus of pundits calling an economic slowdown grew louder, backed up by weak data and some unfavourable headlines. The Australian Dollar is better reflecting the dynamic: it's fallen through the 0.7100 level to eye support at 0.7040. Perhaps the weaker A-Dollar is behind some of the expected lift in Aussie stocks – along with a trifle greater optimism for the fortunes of Aussie banks after NAB’s rate hike yesterday. Whatever way in which we start the day today though, it will occur within the context that pessimism about global increased just a little bit in the last 24 hours.

Australian employment: Australian employment data portrayed a mixed picture of the Australian labour market yesterday. The headlines were attractive. The unemployment rate fell to a very solid 5.0%, supported by jobs growth of 21k in the month of December. Digging deeper however, and the outlook is slightly less rosy. The fall in the unemployment rate was primarily due to a decline in the participation rate, and perhaps worse still, the data showed a -3k contraction in full time jobs. Nothing to panic about, by any means. But it does highlight a level of spare capacity in the economy, and further slack in the labour market. It suggests an economy still some way off meaningful wages growth and inflation for which the RBA is waiting.
  • 0 replies
Carlos Ghosn gone as Chief of Renault - EMEA Brief 24 Jan
After twenty years as a prominent business leader in the global auto industry, Carlos Ghosn resigned the top job at Renault late on Wednesday. He will be replaced as Chairmen by Michelin chief Jean-Dominique Senard and as CEO by Thierry Bollore.
  • 0 replies
The control of the market - APAC brief  24 Jan
The control of the market: The bulls and bears are circling one another, with neither to take control in a meaningful way this week. There is a vacillating in sentiment, maybe as each side recognizes that not enough information has emerged this week to tip favour towards one camp or another. Moments like these can be opportunities whereby markets build to a breaking point. It becomes a matter now of waiting for the necessary evidence to buy-in or sell-out. Headlines are determining intra-day moves in presently, as traders jump at shadows any time the theme of “global growth” or “trade war” arises. The impact of such stories appears to be diminishing now: and impatience has developed. Market participants want substance before they commit themselves to their next move.

The imminent catalysts: It won’t be long before such opportunities arise. US earnings season remains one of them, and overnight earnings beats by the likes of IBM and Procter and Gamble galvanized temporary upside. A slew of PMI figures out of Europe will also be released, before central bank policy comes to the fore too, with the ECB due to meet on Thursday. As can be inferred, the next 24 hours may well centre on Europe, and its apparently ailing economy. Recall, it was the last round of PMI figures released out of Europe that showed a contractionary figure in that measure in several sovereign economies. Coupled with what is assumed to be a dovish ECB President Mario Draghi tonight, and the outlook for global growth may prove up for revision.
  • 0 replies
IGTV round up - 21st - 25th of Jan 2019
I just wanted to give a quick snippet of some interesting IGTV pieces we've put out over the last few days which you may find interesting. You can find more stuff on the IGTV on demand area of Community (you must be a logged in client), but if you have any feedback, requests or suggestions please feel free to drop a comment below.
  • 0 replies
US cancels trade meet with Chinese Officials- EMEA Brief 23 Jan
A mixed session for the Asian markets this morning, following the report of the US cancelling the trade meet with Chinese officials due to outstanding disagreements over intellectual property rules. Shanghai composite, Hang Seng Index and Nikkei 225 rose slightly in comparison to ASX 200, Shenzhen component and Shenzhen composite which saw a slight decline
  • 0 replies
The pull-back is here - APAC brief 23 Jan
The pull-back is here: The pull-back markets were waiting for – the one we inevitably had to have – has arrived. It’s risk-off across financial markets and the optimism that drove global stocks off their December lows has subsided. Relatively speaking, it’s been a day of significant downside, but nothing yet to warrant tremendous fear. It should be common knowledge, but it bears repeating: proper validation that global equities have truly established a recovery ought to be judged not by the latest high, but by where markets form their next low. The retracement which is apparently upon market participants now hands a golden opportunity to judge this market for what it truly is – have the bulls reclaimed their dominance, or have the bears lulled them into a trap, and now stand poised to assert further downside?


The market’s rationale: A greater look at this subject and Wall Street’s price action later. In relation to the overnight sell-off, the rationale was as feeble as the one that got stocks to their recent peaks in the first place. It’s been chalked up to reduced positivity towards the trade-war, and renewed concerns about global growth. To begin with, very little data throughout the past week has provided a clear and substantial picture on economic growth. The boost in sentiment has come from geopolitical or monetary policy developments that was assumed to be supportive of the growth outlook – at some point in the future.  Some nice-noises made between the US and China in trade negotiations here, and a few dovish comments from a handful of US Fed speaker there, is what ignited the latest part of the risk-on rally.
    • Like
  • 0 replies
Gloomy Days Ahead as IMF Cuts Global Forecasts - EMEA Brief 22 Jan
The IMF has cut its forecasts for growth as it says the global economic expansion is losing its momentum, projecting a 3.5% growth rate worldwide for 2019, 0.2 percentage points less than its forecasts in October. This comes just hours after China announced its slowest economic growth in almost three decades.
  • 0 replies
Bullishness settles - APAC brief 22 Jan
Bullishness settles: The ASX200 was sold into the close on a day where the market's bullishness stalled. Nevertheless, the index ended the day in the green, adding 10 points. It's a very headline driven market currently, and the finger is being pointed to news that the US and China are squabbling over intellectual property protections as the cause for the cooler sentiment. US markets were closed for the Martin Luther King Day public holiday, so the lack of tradeable information probably hindered the market too. But almost universally yesterday, financial markets traded on markedly lower activity. The ultimate result was an overall down day for stocks, a mixed day for bonds, a tinge of a bid for safe-haven currencies, while commodities were higher underpinned by well-supported oil prices.

ASX set for flat start: SPI futures are positioned for the ASX200 to open flat-to-very-slightly-higher come today's open. It's a resilient market at present, with the trend line derived from recent lows looking clean and dutifully respected. The bulls guided the-200 above the 5900-mark for the first time in roughly two months yesterday. As widely expected, the market met resistance at the index's 200-day EMA around 5909 during intraday trade, registering a daily high only a skerrick above that point. Yesterday’s daily candle indicates one slightly more vulnerable to bearish control in the very short-term: the sellers overwhelmed the buyers into the back end of the day, bringing about a close in the green, but well-off the day's high.
  • 0 replies
Dividend Adjustments 21 Jan - 28 Jan
Please see the expected dividend adjustment figures for a number of our major indices for the week commencing 21 Jan 2019. If you have any queries or questions on this please let us know.
  • 0 replies
Trade wars improving?, topics for Davos, Brexit timelines - DailyFX Key Themes for the EMEA region
"As of Monday, the countdown will drop to 67 days until the UK is due to leave the European Union according to the two-year timeline dictated by Article 50."
  • 0 replies
Chinese Growth Lowest in 28 Years - EMEA Brief 21 Jan
Chinese growth has officially fallen to its slowest in 28 years. Fourth quarter figures have been announced which confirm analysts’ expectations that growth would be 6.4%, averaging 6.6% for the year.

  • 0 replies
The bulls are coming back: APAC brief 21 Jan
The bulls are coming back: Traders received the greenlight to jump into risk assets on Friday. It culminated in a substantial jump across global equities and a certain “risk-on” attitude to trading. The impetus was arguably more technical than fundamental. The boost in sentiment in being attributed mostly the leaked news that Treasury Secretary Stephen Mnuchin was planning to lift US tariffs on China. Whatever the motive, nefarious or simply untrue, that story was quickly denied by the White House. However, it signalled enough to the market that progress was being made in trade war negotiations. That extra fuel to this recovery’s fire supported a push above very significant technical levels in Wall Street indices, attracting buyers and further validating the view that the December sell-off is behind us.

The stock market’s biggest fan: There’s one market participant who is apparently willing that notion to be true: US President Donald Trump. The US President obviously uses the stock market’s performance as a measure of his success – rightly or wrongly. And over the weekend, amidst the very many Tweets that were Tweeted by Trump, this one outlined his view on the US economy and stock market: “the Economy is one of the best in our history, with unemployment at a 50 year low, and the Stock Market ready to again break a record (set by us many times)…” Quite a pledge to make – and one markets participants aren’t going to take too seriously. Regardless, it does provide a perversely comforting story for markets, to know that the US President is wishing this market higher.
  • 0 replies
What's wrong with predictions?
Join the IG conversation on Community. "There's lots of talk about 'the smart money' banks, institutions, pension funds and the like but not much about the others side of the coin, 'the dumb money', why is that - it's because they just aren't influential to the market. The collective size of the dumb money is dwarfed by the big money to the point of being irrelevant."
  • 3 replies
Stranger Things Have Happened: Netflix Earnings and More – EMEA Brief 18 Jan
Netflix announced subscriber growth of 8.8 million over the past year giving them a total of more than 139 million. Meanwhile, their quarterly revenue was up 27% from the same period in 2017 but the share price is down 3% as they failed to hit analysts’ expectations.
  • 0 replies
Mixed trade - APAC brief 18 Jan
Mixed trade across the globe: Global equity indices have traded mixed in the last 24 hours. Asian trade was soft, European trade was poor, while US indices look as though they will deliver another day in the green. This may not be such a bad thing: perhaps the differing performance across regional indices is a sign of a more discerning market place. Panic about the global economic landscape has subsided for now, allowing traders to take a more nuanced view of the asset class. There is a degree of divergence happening again between US equities and the rest of the world – though it must be said the ASX is still following the lead of Wall Street. Optimism about fundamentals in the US is progressively being restored; that of the rest of the world is still in doubt.


US macro-outlook apparently strong: The notion the US economy is still on solid footing was supported by strong economic data last night. Both unemployment claims and the Philly Fed Manufacturing Index beat expectations, boosting confidence that the labour market and business activity is strong in the US. As has been repeated many-a-time throughout the recent stock-market funk, economic fundamentals could well be secondary or tertiary to other forces previously supporting equity markets.
  • 0 replies
May Day: Theresa survives but for how long?
Theresa May's government holds onto power, winning a no-confidence vote in parliament last night by 325 votes to 306. The Prime Minister has now set out to reach a cross-party solution for Brexit, although this will be extremely difficult as the PM was snubbed by the leader of the opposition last night saying that she is in charge of a "zombie government".
    • Like
  • 0 replies
×
×