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Nexuscrawler

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About Nexuscrawler

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  1. I get why there are minimum stop distances for guaranteed stops due to market volatility and slippage, but what is the logic behind having a minimum stop distance requirement for normal market stops? If there's any slippage I have to pay for it anyway. Taking Litecoin (E1) as an example, there's a minimum market stop distance of 1.25 points. If I'm buying 100 Litecoin, that stop would get triggered once I've lost 125€. Is there a reason why I can't have my position closed when it's going down 0.7 points (70€) during trading hours? Why do I have to lose an artificially imposed amount of money before my stop triggers, especially since I myself would not have this limitation if I remained glued to my monitor? Shouldn't the minimum stop distance just be the size of the spread?
  2. I did, yes, but most of these questions are about the error message you get when you exceed your data allowance, and not actually asking to raise it. The most recent question about it I could find was asked in 2014 and ended with IG saying that they'll look into it. Since it's been more than 5 years I wanted to bring it up again, because it's currently the biggest limitation you have when developing automatic trade programs.
  3. Would a corporation account remove that limit? I imagine I'd actually need a corporation to be able to sign up for one? I do know that this is not allowed for real-time subscriptions for the lightstreamer interface, not sure about the REST API. Even with 5 accounts though, 50.000 data points per week are still rather low. It's just pretty outdated considering today's technology, but on the other hand, IG is one of very few European brokers who even have an API. It just feels a bit abandoned, because requests to raise the historical data limits are made since 2014 and my IG-Labs account is still not activated after a week, hence me giving feedback here. 😃 I'm already querying data for positions only once and then store them in my own database, so once I have the necessary historical data for one position, I'm pretty much set for it. My problem are the 40 other positions and I don't want to wait 40 weeks. A hourly resolution is the minimum I need for my strategy unfortunately. i could maybe go with 6 months for backtesting, but I'd prefer a year since I'd like to hold positions over a long period. I'm using the API to be able to completely automize the lookup of trades, strategy testing and trading. The goal would be for me to not have to do anything at all. 😃 Not sure how I would include ProRealTime into that workflow, unless they also have an API I could use for backtesting. I just need to be able to connect to stuff somehow.
  4. I programmed a bot to automatically create and close orders for me based on several moving averages and trade momentum. I've tried to find a broker with an API for quiet a while now and I think IG might be the best choice for me, but I'm really having trouble testing my trade strategies mainly due to the low data point allowance on historical data. The advantage of using a bot is partially its high ability for number-crunshing, but the incredibly low limit of 10,000 data points per week (~60 points per hour) is just not enough. My bot is iterating through the markets, checking for positions with positive trends. Once it finds them, I want to backtest my strategy for this position to see if the bot would have made or lost money with it. The resolution I'd need for that would be in hours, but for just one year worth of data that's 8,760 data points already and then I'd have to wait a week to get more. It's just not feasible. I know that IG probably has these data limits to prevent people from abusing the API, but the main culprit would not be the amount of data points, but the amount of request. Is there a specific reason why historic data requests are not handled like any other request going to the API (Limited to 60 requests per minute) and instead has this weird way of handling it with data points? The current amount of data could easily be interpreted by a human looking at a chart, which deafeats the whole purpose of having a bot. My suggestion would be to simply set the allowed amount of requests for historical data to 60 per minute, if that limit is not applied already anyway. Set the amount of data points per page to 250 (or 100, or 500, whatever you feel comfortable with) instead of letting the user decide and the just return a link to the next page like it's already being done. This way we could comfortably get all the data we need while still being throttled. It would be great if you could consider it.
  5. @TrendFollower, I think that this is just a bug on the demo account, because it doesn't make much sense to be able to create an order with a deal size of 0. It is even declined with an error message if I try to do that. Just wanted to report it here.
  6. The Min Contract Size for Ether ($1) (Cryptocurrency) is 0. According to the API, it should be 0.5. https://imgur.com/5jAPWPR I'm using a Demo-Account if that helps. On the Live-Account the Min Contract Size is 0.13.
  7. I'm relatively new to trading, so please forgive me if I just have the wrong idea about this. I'm learning as I go with the demo account and try to read through the tutorials and guides that IG provides. Maybe I'm just betting on the wrong horse, but any long term investments into positions that I want to hold over multiple days seem to get eaten up by broker fees. I'm playing around with the demo account for a while now and tested most of the options on both accounts (barriers, indizes, fx, crypto, shares) and the biggest problem I have are the daily fees I have to pay. With the CFD account it seems to be mainly due to the lever where I have to pay interest for the money I borrowed, but there doesn't seem to be a way to only invest my own cash (without using a lever). Or maybe I don't fully understand how levers work yet. The last thing I tried were barrier options and they looked pretty good fee wise. 0,10 cents for creating and ending a call, the knock out fee is low and there's an annual admin fee of 2,5% (2,5% of what?) as far as I could find. So I invested 140€ into Germany 30 Barrier Call, let it sit over night and bam, -0,91€ daily admin fee ... what? That means after holding that position for 15 days without the market moving I've still lost 20% of my investment? Are the fees really just that high, or am I doing things wrong? It's a bit hard for me to decide whether to switch or not to switch to a live account because it's so hard to find solid information what the actual fees are that I will have to pay. I'm finding out by trial and error on the demo account. Don't get me wrong, there seem to be multiple sources where this information apparently can be found, but they are all missing some of it, so you have to read through all of them to get a good picture. Since I'm currently trying to get into trading and learn the basics, maybe long-term positions are just generally a bad idea? I guess I'm a bit naive about the whole thing. 🙂 What would be the best option for me, if I wanted to just invest some money (~1k€), check the market every day or so and maybe sell a few days later? Would I just have to pick a market that moves fast enough to offset the fees? Thanks!
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