Jump to content

Share Dealing - Platform and Offering Expansion


Guest rrc

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I was wondering if IG could please confirm a) if they are looking in to providing the following and b) if so, what the timelines are.

1) fund dealing, UCITS and mutual funds, the type HL, ii, AJBell and most others offer. 
2) adding new international markets, (Canada, France, Switzerland, Hong Kong, Finland, Japan) EM markets like, India, South Africa, Egypt would also be great.
3) provision of better details for company financials (e.g. what Morningstar, Reuters provide and including cash flow statements)

Is IG going to commit to improving their Stock broking offering for the long term, or should current customers be seeking alternative providers? It would be helpful to understand the direction of travel. The stock broking offering seems to have taken a backseat in the strategy yet there is the potential to create a strong competitor to the likes of HL, II, AJ Bell, that offers DMA and good FX charges for foreign dividends, however personally I am growing impatient waiting for the above improvements to happen.

Any information that can be provided would be appreciated.

Many thanks,

Edited by rrc
Link to comment
  • 3 months later...
Guest samjc1319

I would also like clarification on points 1 and 2 raised by @rrc

The inability to access international markets for share dealing really limits the usefulness of what I otherwise think is an excellent platform.

If I am unable to purchase international shares I will be forced to leave IG for one of its competitors which is something I am keen to avoid.

Edited by samjc1319
Link to comment

On your first question, our share dealing proposition was launched in 2014 for UK investors attracted to IG’s superior technology and dealing capabilities (DMA), but also those looking to minimise their cost of investing. At current, we do not have plans to offer fund dealing, but this could of course change in the future. As well as offering shares in individual companies, we also offer over 1,000 exchange-traded funds and hundreds of different investment companies. We also offer a range of ready-made, low-cost portfolios called IG Smart Portfolios, which are managed in partnership with BlackRock.

To answer your second question, we currently offer customers the ability to buy and sell companies from eight different markets, namely; UK, US, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Belgium, Austria and Australia. The reason we do not offer the same international market coverage on ISA and share dealing accounts as we do on CFDs is due to the operational investment required to roll out share dealing markets compared to CFD markets. While CFDs reflect the economic impact of owning an underlying share, they do not result in the CFD trader actually owning those underlying shares. This makes the provision of CFDs across a wide range of underlying instruments much simpler from an operational perspective. Conversely, when our clients trade via our share dealing platform we are required to ensure that our clients have proprietary ownership of the share in question which involves significant tax, reporting, custody and settlement obligations.

Hopefully this explains why our CFD asset coverage (over 15,000 markets) is larger than our share dealing coverage. At current, we believe our offering meets the demands of the majority of our client base, but we are continuously reviewing our offering against the demands of our clients and should we spot an opportunity to extend our coverage we will certainly explore it.

Finally, whilst we are looking at bringing it into the platform, data such as cash flow, balance sheet, and other fundamentals are only surfaced on the Market Analysis pages on IG.com. When logged in, check out the following link for example https://www.ig.com/uk/marketanalysis/ig-shares/lloyds-banking-group-plc-LLOY-UK and you should be able to see some of this required info. 

2019-03-04 15_37_33-LLOY.L _ Lloyds Share Price _ Trade Lloyds Shares.png

2019-03-04 15_38_15-LLOY.L _ Lloyds Share Price _ Trade Lloyds Shares.png

2019-03-04 15_38_35-LLOY.L _ Lloyds Share Price _ Trade Lloyds Shares.png

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • General Statistics

    • Total Topics
      21,172
    • Total Posts
      90,693
    • Total Members
      41,276
    • Most Online
      7,522
      10/06/21 10:53

    Newest Member
    Wessie456
    Joined 28/01/23 06:55
  • Posts

    • Capital, win loss ratio. If you have a trading edge and you can consistently win 50% of your trades, so your winning 5 trades out of 10. So if your risking 1% of your capital per trade, out of your 10 trades 5 would be losers, so that’s 5% loss and realistically out of the 5 winning trades, some would make small profits, some break even and 1, 2 or 3 could run nicely IF you can let your profits run, basically your making money out of 2 trades out of the 10 trades (80/20 Rule Pareto principle) So a $20,000 acct risking 1% is $200 per trade, this will keep the trader with his trade risk based on being able to win 50% of his trades. A long term trend trader can win with 30% wining trade. Basically you need to know your numbers. Rgds Pete
    • Investing in stocks can be a great way to grow your wealth over time. However, there are different approaches that investors can take when choosing which stocks to buy. Two of the most popular approaches are growth investing and value investing. Growth Investing Growth investing is an investment strategy that focuses on buying stocks of companies that are expected to grow at a faster rate than the overall market. These companies are often in industries that are growing quickly, such as technology or healthcare. Investors who use this approach believe that these companies will be able to generate higher profits in the future, which will lead to higher stock prices. One of the main advantages of growth investing is that it can potentially provide higher returns than the overall market. However, it is also riskier than other investment strategies, as these companies often have higher valuations and more volatile stock prices. Value Investing Value investing is an investment strategy that focuses on buying stocks of companies that are undervalued by the market. These companies may be in industries that are out of favour or have recently experienced challenges, but they have strong fundamentals and a history of profitability. Investors who use this approach believe that these companies are undervalued and that their true value will be recognized in the future, leading to higher stock prices. One of the main advantages of value investing is that it can potentially provide lower risk than growth investing. However, it may also provide lower returns in the long run, as these companies may not have the same growth potential as companies in the growth investing category. Comparing Growth and Value Investing Growth and value investing are two different approaches to stock investing, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Growth investing can potentially provide higher returns but is riskier, while value investing can provide lower risk but potentially lower returns. An investor may choose one approach or a combination of both. A portfolio that contains a mix of growth and value stocks can provide a balance of potential returns and risk. Conclusion Both growth investing and value investing can be effective ways to invest in stocks. The key is to understand the potential risks and rewards of each approach and to choose the one that aligns with your investment goals and risk tolerance. Analyst Peter Mathers TradingLounge™ 
    • I am a beginner, and I must say, there are a lot of rules to the trading game that one must abide by if they want to be successful.   Here, the writer mentions several basic rules for day vs swing trading.  However, I find that often times, the reasoning for these rules is not as  obvious for a beginner as it may be for an expert.   The 'why' factor if I may. For example, why must you have a large capital to trade with as a day trader? Because your positions must be large so that a small change in price will be augmented and turned into a large profit. Also, with such high risk, the margin will be specially high, given the trader is taking up large positions at a time.  Without a large amount of capital, positions may be forced to close due to funds being below margin requirements.  When this happens, you can expect to lose tons of cash, fast.  I learned the hard way. All the best, David Franco      
×
×
  • Create New...