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U.S. Government Shutdown set to continue - EMEA Brief 24 Dec

The U.S. Government has seen turmoil over the weekend after "Trump's Wall" disagreement on Friday resulted in a government shutdown. Trump will be bringing in the new year with new Defence Secretary. Patrick Shanahan will replace James Mattis on 1st January, earlier than expected.  The end of the year sees further stock slumps, particularly for 2018 tech IPOs. Domo plummeting 25%, Zscaler tumbling 18% and Zurora and SurveyMonkey falling over 10% Asian Stocks saw a mixed Monday session with Samsung Electronics declining 0.13% and SK Hynix rising 0.83%. BMW is facing criminal further investigation in South Korea after it was found that the company concealed fire hazards and delayed recalls. This potential prosecution follows a $10 million fine.  Asian overnight: A threadbare Asian session saw just the Chinese stock market open, with both the Shanghai and Shenzhen composite gaining ground. A Tsunami in  Indonesia on Saturday has left at least 200 dead and 800 injured after destroying hotels, houses and a gathering of beach concert attendees.   UK, US and Europe: Weekend affairs centred on the US, with the partial government shutdown coming into play as the President warned that the government shutdown could be in place for a long time. Parts of the U.S. government closed after Congress failed to agree, by Friday's midnight deadline, on Severn spending bills affecting nine departments. The disagreement appears sparked by the Democrats refusal to approve Trump's $5 billion Mexican Wall budget. Meanwhile, the US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin rattled market sentiment after announcing that he had conversations with the big US banks to ensure they have enough liquidity. That is not typically something that would take place unless there was a current or impending threat to the economy. Looking ahead, there are precious few economic events to watch out for on the coming days. Economic calendar - key events and forecast (times in GMT) 1.30pm – US Chicago Fed index (November): expected to rise to 0.9 from 0.2. Markets to watch: US indices, USD crosses Source: Daily FX Economic Calendar   Corporate News, Upgrades and Downgrades Playtech said that new Italian legislation would hit 2019 adjusted earnings by around €20 – 25 million.  IGTV featured video Information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary.

MichaelaIG

MichaelaIG

Dividend Adjustments 24 Dec Nov - 31 Dec

Expected index adjustments  Please see the expected dividend adjustment figures for a number of our major indices for the week commencing 24 Dec 2018. If you have any queries or questions on this please let us know in the comments section below. For further information regarding dividend adjustments, and how they affect  your positions, please take a look at the video.  NB: All dividend adjustments are forecasts and therefore speculative. A dividend adjustment is a 
cash neutral adjustment on your account. Special Divs are highlighted in orange. Special dividends this week Index Bloomberg Code Effective Date Summary Dividend Amount RTY EVI US 24/12/2018 Special Div 13 RTY ABR US 27/12/2018 Special Div 15 RTY CNXN US 27/12/2018 Special Div 32 RTY NRC US 28/12/2018 Special Div 5 RTY CHMI US 28/12/2018 Special Div 15 SPX CME US 27/12/2018 Special Div 175 SPX HST US 28/12/2018 Special Div 5   How do dividend adjustments work?  As you know, constituent stocks of an index will periodically pay dividends to shareholders. When they do, the overall value of the index is affected, causing it to drop by a certain amount. Each week, we receive the forecast for the number of points any index is due to drop by, and we publish this for you. As dividends are scheduled, public events, it is important to remember that leveraged index traders can neither profit nor lose from such price movements. This information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary.

MaxIG

MaxIG

Wall Street rout - APAC brief 24 Dec

Wall Street rout: Wall Street capped-off last week with another day of considerable losses, even despite Europe posting an okay day. Come the end of the trading session, the Dow Jones had lost 1.81 per cent, the S&P500 had lost 2.06 per cent and the NASDAQ had lost 2.99 per cent. The fact markets are entering the thin holiday period doesn’t help. One assumes that many-a investor would be rather reluctant to be sitting at Christmas lunch this year holding open-positions in equities given this market. Friday’s volume was extraordinarily high, especially in the Dow Jones, which saw activity 140% of its 30-day average. That statistic is particularly remarkable when considering that the past 30 days have seen volumes at levels very elevated by broader historical standards. A down day, week, month, quarter: Looking at the S&P500 as the natural benchmark, US equities have shed 12.5 per cent so far in December, and 17.1 per cent in the fourth quarter. The 14-day RSI is flashing signs of an oversold market presently, however historical trading patterns suggest the S&P can dive lower, and momentum indicators are showing bearish-momentum is still building. A technical bear market, defined as a 20 per cent drop from previous highs, looks reasonably imminent given the current context. The NASDAQ, for one, is already there. Perhaps another concerning signal, IG’s sentiment measure is indicating traders are 70 per cent net long the S&P, implying that many traders may be trying “catch a falling knife”. If big-money keeps selling, the unwinding of these long positions could hasten the market’s tumble. Market-wariness: With all of this in mind, even if this bearish-trend feels overdone, and that therefore an inevitable bounce must be in store, it pays to understand this can get worse. That isn’t to prophesize and suggest that it will, but more that these circumstances require higher vigilance. As the cliché goes, the trend is your friend: with panic causing normal behaviour and correlations to break-down, falling back on that one may be comforting. Of course, these ideas only speak for 50 per cent of the traders in this marker presently. The uber-bears – particularly the ones who have been calling a central bank engineered market burn-out for years – are presumably feeling vindicated at-the-moment. If not that, then at least a little richer this Christmas than compared to last year’s. It’s still the Fed: To address the driver of current market activity: it is still fundamentally about the Fed. There seems to be an unshakeable notion held by market participants that the US central bank is way off the mark with their policy and views on the economy. A handful of central bank speakers have hit the hustings, so to speak, in the last several days to defend the bank’s position. An interesting question that keeps getting asked (more-or-less) is if by the bank’s own modelling inflation is going to undershoot, why lift rates now at all? The answer is frequently something that resembles the “data dependant” line, made to mean that the Fed’s forecasts are dynamic and therefore so is their decision making. Trump’s Powell-problem: The problem is, traders aren’t buying it: they likely want to hear here-and-now that hikes will stop. It’s been made a little more difficult in the last 48 hours to get a read on how this sentiment is evolving in markets. Looking at US Treasuries for one, there’s been a slight risk premium seemingly priced into yields after US President Trump drove the US government into shut down over the weekend. This may be exacerbated today and into the week by reports over the weekend (since denied by White House Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin) that the US President had several serious conversations last week about firing Federal Reserve Chairperson Jerome Powell because of the central bank’s recent policy actions, and views on the US economy. Political instability: He couldn’t do it, could he? According to many, legislation does open-up the possibility that a President can fire the Fed Governor for “cause”. It’s an ambiguous one, and a low probability event at this stage. But all this institutional dysfunction is spooking market participants. Not that the political instability hasn’t been the norm in last few years; the perception is though it’s getting a trifle worse. It’s an international phenomenon and strikes at the core of international political system. It’s manifesting in Brexit, in US politics, in France’s yellow vests movement, in the trade-war – and on and on. Financial markets take an amoral position on such subjects; however, they do manifest emotion, and right now the political climate is leading to a lift in fear. Australia: Trading in sympathy with Wall Street’s rout on Friday, the last traded SPI Futures price has the ASX200 opening 40 points lower today. There’s been a level of bemusement in the financial press about how rapidly this sell off took hold. Another down day today brings into clearer view the boundary line of the ASX200’s post-GFC bull-run trend channel at about 5380. The Aussie Dollar will also be an interesting one: it tumbled to rest on support at 0.7040 over the weekend. As fears build about the strength of the Australian economy, and greater volatility in global markets leads to diminishing risk appetite, an AUD/USD exchange rate with a 6 in front of it at some point this week is becoming a stronger possibility.

MaxIG

MaxIG

Facebook to create a Cryptocurrency for Whatsapp- EMEA Brief 21 Dec

Facebook Inc. works on its plans to create a cryptocurrency allowing money to be transferred on Whatsapp, focusing on the remittances market in India first Chinese stocks become one of the worst performers globally as the Shanghai composite and Shenzhen index fall over 20% and 30% respectively this year US Futures show a slight incline in performance for stocks on Wall Street, following a fall for the second day in a row. Dow Jones Industrial Average suggests an opening gain over around 113.40 on Friday morning, following the decline on Thursday of 464.06 points. S&P 500 and the Nasdaq Composite are also pointed to opening gains, after they decreased by 1.58% and 1.6% respectively on Thursday Nissan Chairman re-arrested on new allegations of aggravated breach of trust which suspects that Ghosn “made the automaker shoulder personal investment losses of around $16.6million, incurred in 2008”. The court rejected a request to extend his detention, meaning Ghosn could potentially apply to be released on bail The Secretary of Defense, James Mattis, is to step down at the end of February, as he believes Trump should “have a Secretary of Defense whose views are better aligned with yours” Former Canadian Diplomat, Michael Kovrig, was taken whilst in China following the arrest on Huawei CFO, has now been detained but denied legal representation Hewlett Packard Enterprise and IBM had its network breached by hackers working on behalf of China’s Ministry of State Security, for access to hack into clients computers Trump administration plans to pull thousands of troops from Afghanistan, in hope that around 7000 troops can be sent home within months Boris Johnson cleared of breaking the Tories’ code of conduct, following a remark made about women wearing burkas Asian overnight: Asian markets were back in the red overnight, with Japanese markets leading the declines amid a flight to the safe haven Yen. Fears over a government shutdown are now front and centre of the collective investor mindset, with Donald Trump threatening to veto a bill funding the government unless he receives funds to build a border wall with Mexico. On the data front, Japanese national CPI declines to 0.9% from 1%, marking the first fall in inflation for six-months UK, US and Europe: Looking ahead, the pound remains a key focus for traders, with UK current account, GDP (Q3 Final), public sector net borrowing, and the BoE quarterly bulletin all being released. In the afternoon, keep an eye out for Canadian GDP and retail sales, with the Canadian dollar also relatively volatile around the recent sharp declines in energy prices. The US also looks set for a busy end to the week, with core durable goods, GDP, core PCE price index, and personal spending all worth following Economic calendar - key events and forecast (times in GMT) Source: Daily FX Economic Calendar 9.30am – UK GDP (Q3, final): growth expected to be 0.6% QoQ and 1.5% YoY. Markets to watch: GBP crosses
1.30pm – US durable goods orders (November): forecast to rise 1.2% MoM and up 0.2% MoM excluding transportation orders. Markets to watch: US indices, USD crosses Corporate News, Upgrades and Downgrades Anglo American has resumed mining operations at Minas-Rio in Brazil.  Diageo has sold a portfolio of 19 brands to Sazerac for $550 million.  In partnership with Dada-JD Daojia, a logistics company, Walmart are testing on a smaller store in Chengdu to focus on lower-tier cities, as online delivery services show an increase in China Tencent shares increase around 4.2% following the news that new games have been cleared for sale, after China stopped approving new titles in March Ontex upgraded to neutral at Goldman British Land downgraded to reduce at AlphaValue
Headlam downgraded to hold at Peel Hunt
Klepierre downgraded to reduce at AlphaValue
Telenor cut to hold at SEB Equities
  IGTV featured video Information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary. 

KatherineIG

KatherineIG

Markets Decline on Fed Rate Hike - EMEA Brief 20 Dec

Markets fall as Fed raised US interest rate from 2.25% to 2.5% At its lowest the Dow fell over 4% following the announcement (its lowest point in over a year) of which it has now seen a small retracement. Asian markets we also affected, the Hang Seng was down 1.24% at close whereas the Nikkei lost 2.84%, a 15-month low The announcement saw the dollar gain almost 0.5% against the dollar basket but as investors have fully digested the statements made by the Fed this now sits at a 0.16% gain.  As can be expected, the inverse was seen from gold which fell 0.8% and has now recovered half of that. Oil has lost most of the gains made in yesterday amongst demand and over supply fears. This comes as U.S inventories have dropped and OPEC have reduce output by 1.2 million barrels per day Looking ahead, the Bank of England are set to make their rate announcement today although forecasts expect them to remain at 0.75%. Brexit is currently dominating the UK rate, analysts have stated they would normally expect a raise in current conditions but the BoE have implied they are also mindful of the possibility of a no-deal Brexit. Asian overnight: Asian markets have followed their US counterparts lower, coming off the back of the Fed’s decision to raise rates for the fourth time. This drop comes despite the dot plot shifting the expectations to two rate hikes in 2019, rather than three. Japanese indices suffered the most overnight, with the BoJ rate decision also coming into play. Kuroda & co decided to keep rates steady, also pointing out that that is unlikely to change anytime soon given that inflation expectations remain relatively subdued.  UK, US and Europe: Looking ahead, the Bank of England maintains the central bank focus, with the MPC widely expected to keep policy steady. With UK retail sales also due out, it should be a volatile morning for the pound. In the US watch out for the Philly Fed manufacturing survey. Whilst this rate hike was largely expected by investors, many believed that this rate hike would be the last in this tightening cycle. However, the announcement made by the Chair of the Fed, Jerome Powell was less dovish than expected. Whilst original projections we for three rate increases in 2019, this has now been reduced to two. Powell also reiterated that politics played no role in influencing their decision as Trump has criticised the Fed in the past for subduing the economy by raising rates. Economic calendar - key events and forecast (times in GMT) Source: Daily FX Economic Calendar 9.30am – UK retail sales (November): sales to rise 3.4% YoY. Markets to watch: GBP crosses
12pm – BoE rate decision: no change in rates expected. Markets to watch: GBP crosses
11.30pm – Japan CPI (November): prices to rise 1.4% YoY, and core CPI to rise 1%. Markets to watch: JPY crosses Corporate News, Upgrades and Downgrades Stagecoach has agreed to sell its North America division for $271 million, as it refocuses on its UK operations.  AstraZeneca said that the US FDA had approved its ovarian cancer treatment. Separately, it said that two trials for chronic kidney disease had met their primary objectives.  Kier reported that less than 40% of shareholders took up the rights issue, although it had managed to raise the £250 million required.  Pinterest are said to be preparing for an IPO as early as April 2019 Ceconomy upgraded to hold at HSBC
Geox upgraded to neutral at Mediobanca SpA Ashmore downgraded to sell at Citi
Funding Circle Holdings downgraded to sell at Citi
Man Group downgraded to neutral at Citi
Novozymes downgraded to underweight at JPMorgan IGTV featured video Information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary. 

IGAaronC

IGAaronC

Fed on tap - APAC brief 20 Dec

Fed on tap: It’s a commentary written on the fly this morning, as developments out of this morning’s US Federal Reserve meeting are being digested by markets. The Fed has hiked rates just as they were expected to do, with market participants now trawling through the fine print in the Fed’s commentary. We were expecting a “dovish hike”; what we got looks like a “less-dovish than-expected-hike”. The dot plots were revised as presumed: the Fed has told the markets that it expects interest rates to be lifted twice in 2019, rather than the three-times implied in the September dot-plots. It also downgraded its growth expectations and hinted unemployment is likely to pick up in the medium term. Overall, though, at first glance this looks like a Fed reasonably content with their policy position, as well as the position of the US economy. First responders: Price action in markets have been interesting. The message being delivered by the Fed is somewhat curious. Initial judgements are that they’ve struck quite an effective tone, albeit one that was probably different to that which was implied in market pricing prior to the event. US stocks are paring their gains for the day; volume has returned to Wall Street, after being below its average for most of the session last night. The NASDAQ is in the red presently: momentum stocks (read: information technology firms) are being hurt by the “less-dovish” Fed. Investors don’t want to buy into growth, it would seem. The intraday trend is pointing to a down day for Wall Street, though naturally that could turn in the next hour-and-a-half. Rates markets: The VIX is down currently, which is a good early indicator that markets are less-uncertain after the Fed’s announcement. That’s not always guaranteed and is liable to change today; one assumes policy makers would be pleased with that outcome. Interest rate markets, as the data presents itself in the Bloomberg World Interest Rate Probability data, aren’t presenting signs of adjustment yet. That indicator still implies only a modest 14 basis points of hikes into 2019 from the Fed – though it is showing a greater chance that the central bank will stop or even reverse course in 2020. Arguably, the most interesting price action has transpired in US breakeven inflation rates: the 5 Year indicator has dropped to imply future inflation of just below 1.6 per cent – well below the Fed’s target level of 2.00 per cent. Powell Press Conference: Fed Chairperson has delivered his commentary and is taking questions from the press. Markets are reacting quite well to what he is saying but most asset classes are still swinging around a lot. The “data-dependant” line is being touted once again, suggesting a flexibility to future policy decision. The dot-plots too, it has been stated several times, is not a consensus estimate or guideline and is subject to revision. Traders ought to take comfort from that notion: if things get uglier, for whatever reason, the Fed will provide some sort of a back stop – a low-premium Powell-put, perhaps. However, a positive – a less dovish, more hawkish – tone has been delivered. Powell is waving away some of the recent financial market volatility, despite acknowledging that financial conditions are less accommodative for economic growth. Bonds and currencies: Bond and currency markets have been the locus of activity, as one would assume. Sentiment is still shifting in response to new information, though some insights into the collective consciousness of traders can be inferred. The US Dollar is turning higher for the day, climbing toward 97 according to the US Dollar index. The greenback is performing best against risk and growth sensitive currencies like the Australian Dollar: our currency has been dumped, tumbling over 1 per cent to sit just above 0.7100, at present. Bonds are rallying across the board and all the way across the curve. US Treasuries are of course leading the drive: there is the feeling that risk aversion is taking hold now. Equities are selling-off: one criticism popping up now is the Fed is not taking financial market volatility seriously-enough. US Treasury yields: A cursory analysis of the yield curve is presenting some interesting information, too: the yield on rate sensitive US 2 Year note has fallen by 2 points at time of writing, but the US 10 Year note has fallen by an even greater 5. The spread between those two assets has narrowed to 13 points. Traders are suggesting, as they had been at stages in the lead up to this Fed meeting, it expects the Fed to keep tightening rates, even in the face of lower inflation and growth prospects. If anything is going to spark fear and further volatility today, it’s probably going to be based on that point. An imminent-enough economic slow-down is upon us, it is being implied, however the Fed will likely stick to its strategy of restricting financial conditions by lifting interest rates. The aftermath: The event is more-or-less over now: all the official information is out-there, and Powell has delivered his press conference. Now traders trade and speculate on what has been communicated to the market. After holding up well enough initially, US equities are being smashed and futures markets are pricing in a sell-off across both European and Asia markets. Looking at the market-map of the S&P500, it’s all a sea of red now, with just over half an hour left in trade. That index is clambering to hold onto the 2500 handle, while the Dow Jones has just registered a new year-to-date, intra-day-low. After all the formalities, market participants are behaving none-too-happy with what they have received this morning: stocks are off on volumes that have gone through the roof, credit spreads have widened, and safe-havens are being sought out. ASX today: Though it has suffered in the global equity sell-off, the ASX200 has held-up rather well of last, at least when compared to its global peers. SPI Futures have swung heavily this morning, vacillating all in the time it takes to type a sentence in a range between 7-to-25-points. Yesterday was a soft day for Australian shares as traders positioned for this morning’s Fed; the only bright spot for the session was the announcement from APRA it was going to lift lending restrictions on investor only loans. That fact gave the real estate sector, the banks and the consumer staples space a boost. What’s in store for the day ahead is hard to pick for a trader right now: the markets are shifting so rapidly. Anything more than a flat day for Aussie shares would be surprising. IG is pricing the ASX at 5560 as of 7.45AM, with the recent intra-day low of 5551 the level to watch today.

MaxIG

MaxIG

Could Bitcoin have finally found stability? - EMEA Brief 19 Dec

Bitcoin could have bottomed as its priced stabilized after the big disappointment it gave earlier this year. As the cryptocurrency has corrected 80-90% multiple times in the past, the slump this year could only be another bump in the road. However, scalability issues flog the currency as its promoters try to entail it in the real economy. Is the crypto market ready for another roller-coaster? Oil temporarily bottomed after falling 7%, amidst concerns over the strength of global trade. West Texas Intermediate fluctuated around $46.28 a barrel, after gaining 0.1%. Investors keep an eye out for the US crude inventories, with the recent decline highlighting expectations of continued oversupply despite the OPEC+ production cut vow. Gold prices edged higher to a more than five-month peak supported by a softer greenback and uncertainty towards today’s Fed’s hike decision. The yellow metal hit its highest since July 11 at $1,251.06 earlier in the current trading session. The continued stock rout this year seem to have commodity traders excited again about the bullion. Trading in Asia was mixed, with investors titubant about the FOMC rate decision due today. Softbank’s weak IPO did not help shares in Japan, where the Topix fell 0.6%. Indices fell also in China and Australia but kept steady in Hong Kong. Japanese 10-year bonds yield climbed almost to zero for the first time since September 2017. The recent decline in government bond yields provided for more liquidity moving to Yen and Yen-denominated assets. Asian overnight: Another bearish session overnight has seen losses across Asia, with the Hong Kong’s Hang Seng providing the one flash of green after posting a miniscule gain of less than 0.1%. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan gained 0.4 percent, Japan's Nikkei steadied after an early dip and E-Mini futures for the S&P 500 added 0.2 percent.With the Fed widely expected to raise rates once again today, emerging markets are understandably under pressure given their exposure to USD-denominated debt. Donald Trump's warns not to "make yet another mistake" will unlikely affect the FOMC meeting today. UK, US and Europe: Italian budget plan Odyssey continues as the European Commission is due to meet today to discuss the country’s spending plan. Italy cut its deficit target for next year to 2.04% of GDP from the initial 2.4% after the skirmish with the EU. Concerns that deficit projections could be underestimated could jeopardize the Italian populist government’s case to the EU. The major risk is that the plan will not deliver the expected growth in Italy. EU is already tackling difficult Brexit negotiations and the slowing global economy does not help. As a G7 country, Italy could prove to be an earthquake to the EU unity. Economic calendar - key events and forecast (times in GMT) Source: Daily FX Economic Calendar 9.30am – UK CPI (November): prices to rise 2.5% YoY and 0.2% MoM, and Core PCI to rise 2.2% YoY. Markets to watch: GBP crosses 1.30pm – Canada CPI (November): CPI to rise 2.2% YoY from 2.4%. Markets to watch: CAD crosses 3pm – US existing home sales (November): sales to fall 0.5% MoM from a 1.4% increase. Markets to watch: US indices, USD crosses 3.30pm – US EIA crude inventories (w/e 14 December): stockpiles to rise by 1.1 million barrels. Markets to watch: Brent, WTI 7pm – Fed rate decision: rates are expected to rise to 2.5% from 2.25%, but the main focus will be on the future path, and we may get some hints about this in the statement and in the press conference at 7.30pm. Markets to watch: US indices, USD crosses
  Corporate News, Upgrades and Downgrades GlaxoSmithKline has agreed to spin off its consumer health business into a joint venture with Pfizer, in which GSK will have a controlling interest of 68%. Within three years of closing the transaction, GSK intends to demerge the consumer division from the pharma business.  Polymetal has completed the non-cash asset swap of its Tarutin property in Russia for 85% of a Kazakhstan copper-gold property.  Versarien reports that it has signed a non-binding agreement with an unnamed Chinese state-owned aerospace firm.  Bpost upgraded to outperform at RBC
Fresenius SE upgraded to buy at Goldman
Kongsberg upgraded to buy at SEB Equities
Petrofac upgraded to buy at Kepler Cheuvreux Asos downgraded to outperform at RBC IGTV featured video Information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary.  

IG-Andi

IG-Andi

US Fed watch: APAC brief 19 Dec

US Fed watch: The US Fed meeting has been kickstarted and the markets are shuffling around in anticipation. US equities at time of writing are putting in a mixed performance, though al major Wall Street indices remain trading below key technical levels. It comes following a day in which Asian and European markets sold-off in sympathy with Monday night’s rout in North American shares. A desire for safety has supported a bid in US Treasuries: they are higher across the board. Interest rates traders are also grinding away, pricing out point-by-point interest rates hikes from the Fed in 2019. The US Dollar has dipped as traders take safety in other haven currencies: the US Dollar Index is below 97, mostly courtesy of a play into the EUR and the Japanese Yen. The weaker greenback has provided a lift in gold prices, with the yellow metal trading just below support at $US1250 per ounce. The Fed’s biggest critic: Everyone has an opinion on what the Fed ought to do, it seems. The most powerful voice of all, US President Donald Trump, has certainly weighed in on the subject, Tweeting: “I hope the people over at the Fed will read today’s Wall Street Journal Editorial before they make yet another mistake. Also, don’t let the market become any more illiquid than it already is. Stop with the 50 B’s. Feel the market, don’t just go by meaningless numbers. Good luck!” Never mind that President Trump’s policies, from major tax cuts and his trade war have contributed to the Fed’s invidious position. The President clearly is noting his concern about one of his hitherto favourite measures of personal success: the health of the US stock market. Whether rightly or wrongly, market participants, as contained within the price action in global markets, appear to agree with President Trump. Market sentiment: Cool it with the hikes, guys! Is the message. Traders obviously can’t take much of it any more. Risk is off the table and bets are being placed that we are in for a “dovish hike”. That is: a hike tomorrow, but a very careful downgrade in the projections for future hikes. It’s an incredibly tight rope the Fed must walk. On one hand, they’ll need to assure markets that they remain accommodative of US (and the globe’s) financial and economic health; while on the other, they can’t seem so accommodative as to reveal a level of genuine fear about what could be in store for markets and the economy in the future. The problem is, markets are going deep on the notion that a dovish Fed is upon us. The possibility is that the markets have set the bar too low. The big risk: Thus, even a sprinkling of hawkishness about rates could prompt a big repositioning in markets. The first reaction would be in rates markets, but that would transfer quickly into the prices of US Treasuries. Overnight, the yield on the US 2 Year note and the US 10 Year note dropped by 4 and 3 points, respectively. The spread between those two assets has gradually widened since narrowing to about 9 point a fortnight or-so ago, to sit around 17 points now. The back end of the curve will remain mostly responsive to growth and inflation expectations, but if the Fed adopt a more hawkish line, yields on the 2 Years could rally-hard, re-narrowing spread considerably. Out would come the recessionistas in such an event and the global share market, led by Wall Street indices, could possibly convulse. Danger signs still flashing: Highly sensitive market-participants wouldn’t appreciate the shock. Again, in last night’s session, amber lights were flashing in certain segments of the market. Junk bonds suffered the most, with the spread on high yield credit widening to multi-year highs. The dynamic was fuelled by another tumble in oil prices on fears of a slow-down in economic activity will cause a supply glut. Thinner liquidity brought about by tighter financial conditions isn’t making the situation any more manageable. The price of WTI is now at $US46 per barrel at time of writing, having fallen over 7 per cent in the last 24 hours. Energy stocks the world over, not mentioned the Loonie, have dropped, and assets pricing in implied inflation have modestly dipped – portending further difficulty for the likes of the Fed to maintain price growth at targeted levels. ASX resilience: SPI futures have been whipping around a bit in late American trade. There’s an hour to go on Wall Street as this is being written, and the major share indices are gravitating back to their opening price. It could be risk is (justifiably) being taken off the table here in anticipation for the Fed. So: futures are suggesting a give-up of 8 points for the ASX200 at the outset, adding to yesterday’s pain. To the credit to the Aussie index, the 5600-level isn’t being let go without a fight. The buyers entered the market yesterday on numerous occasions to push the market above that point, only to be overwhelmed by sellers, who rammed home the overwhelming negative sentiment. Technical indicators aren’t necessarily pointing entirely to sustained downside in the ASX200, but a succession of lower-highs in the past few sessions indicate the bulls could be getting exhausted. What’ll save us? Australian equities never became quite as elevated as their US counterparts did over the last decade, perhaps implying if we are entering a bear market, ours won’t be as severe. However, given the share market self-off has been inspired by fears of slower global growth, Australia’s exposure to any wreckage is all but unavoidable. The miners haven’t demonstrated the sort of stress one might expect, but the banks are being belted (they gave up 27 points yesterday), while the health care sector is unwinding the market leading gains of the year and the energy space is falling with the oil price. Arguably the best thing that could happen is a truce in the trade war to ease burden on the Australian economy; however, after Xi Jinping’s defiant speech yesterday, plus the issues of tighter financial conditions, perhaps the benefit of any improvement in global trade relations trade will be marginal.

MaxIG

MaxIG

Indicator update: Customising RSI levels

On the back of client feedback we now offer the possibility to customise the RSI levels on desktop and mobile devices. To do so, click on the RSI label once you have enable the indicator on your chart. This will open a dialog box that will allow you to change the levels (which are set at the default levels of 30/70), as well as customise the period and the colour of the lines. What is RSI? The Relative Strength Index is a momentum indicator that measures the magnitude of recent price changes to evaluate whether a stock is oversold or overbought. This indicator can oscillate between 0 and 100 and usually uses the level of 30 to indicate that a stock is oversold and the level of 70 to indicate that a stock is overbought. The RSI indicator uses the average percentage gains and losses of a specific period which is usually the last 14 days. When a candle closes after a positive move (a green candle stick) the RSI value will increase, whilst after a negative move (a red candle stick) it will fall as the number. The RSI value will be 0 if stocks fall on all 14 days and 100 if the price moves up on all the days. Like the price, the RSI creates highs and lows that can be connected to create resistance and support levels. In the same way as price action, these support and resistance levels can also be tested, broken and retested. How RSI is used as a forward-looking indicator These support and resistance levels can be broken on the RSI chart before they are broken on the price chart, which can create an opportunity to profit on a reversal before it takes place on the price. As with all indicators this is never a guarantee, however it does provide a qualitative supportive argument for possible price action. Let’s look at the Eurodollar 1-hour chart as an example of this resistance break: We can see that both the price and the RSI are testing a resistance level, but the breakthrough happens one candlestick before on the RSI chart than it does in the price chart. In this case, the RSI is a leading signal that offers possibility to enter the market at a more favourable price an hour before the actual price level breaks through the resistance level. Why would you adjust the RSI levels? For the RSI to be most effective, it has to be adjusted for the inherent volatility of a specific stock or market. In a very volatile environment the RSI is likely to hit the overbought and oversold levels with more frequency, weakening the reliability of the RSI as a leading indicator. When you widen the resistance and support levels you will probably have fewer trends, but they will possibly be better signals. As can be seen on the FTSE100 15-minute graphs below, the RSI tests the 30-support level various times, but it is not until it tests the 20-support level that the price trends actually reverses.  

DanielaIG

DanielaIG

Concerns over Rate Hikes and Economic Slowdown - EMEA Brief 18 Dec

The FOMC will begin its 2 day meeting today, with the markets expecting a 25 basis points interest rate increase upon its announcement on Wednesday, which would make this its fourth hike this year.  Homebuilder sentiment in the US declined in December to its lowest point in over 3 years, and could be an early indication of an economic softening. Theresa May has announced that the "meaningful vote" for her Brexit Withdrawal Agreement is due to be held in the third week of January, after it was postponed last week amid fears of a defeat.  US stocks closed at the lowest level in over 14 months yesterday, with the S&P dropping 2% to 2545.94 and the Dow diving 500 points to 23592.98. This comes as investors fear for the health of the global economy ahead of the Federal Reserve’s final policy meeting of the year. Asia-Pacific stocks also went into retreat on Tuesday as the Hang Seng was down 0.9% in afternoon trading, whilst the CSI 300 and the Topix shed 1.2% and 1.7%, respectively. The Dollar lost 0.2% against the Japanese Yen, falling to 112.53 yen. The Euro was mostly steady at $1.1342, maintaining the 0.4% gain it made on Monday.  Oil prices extended losses on the back of signs of oversupply in the United States: US Crude drops 2.6% to a 14-month low, settling at $49.88. Bitcoin has recovered from its sharp fall at the beginning of the month, rising more than 10% yesterday as the digital currency benefited from a strong support near the $3,000 level.  Asian overnight: A sea of red has been evident in overnight markets, as sentiment continues to sour ahead of tomorrow's FOMC meeting. Particularly notable losses in Japan came amid a strengthening yen in play through the beginning of the week. In China, a speech from President Xi Jinping offered up little in the way of new policies, instead spending much of the speech extolling the virtues of the communist party. Meanwhile, the RBA minutes signalled that the next rate move is likely to be up rather than down, although this was largely priced in given the subsequent fall in AUDUSD. UK, US and Europe: Looking ahead, the bearish sentiment evident in Europe could easily continue today given the overnight losses, while the major release of the session comes from the German Ifo business climate figure. In the afternoon keep an eye out for the latest building permits and housing starts figures. Economic calendar - key events and forecast (times in GMT) Source: Daily FX Economic Calendar 9am – German IFO (December): business climate index to rise to 102.7 from 102. Markets to watch: EUR crosses
1.30pm – US housing starts & building permits (November): watch for a rebound from last month’s decline in activity, as the US housing market continues to worry investors. Markets to watch: US indices, USD crosses Corporate News, Upgrades and Downgrades ASOS shares plummeted over 40% yesterday on the back of a profit warning, adding to fears of a struggling retail sector and triggering a sell-off in fashion retail stocks across Europe.  Huawei says it has secured over 25 commercial contracts for its 5G technology. Petrofac said it was trading in line with forecasts, with $5 billion of orders won in the year so far.   Wood Group has won a $66 million contract to supply control technologies to Sellafield nuclear plant.  Malaysia have filed criminal charges against Goldman Sachs and 2 bankers over they're alleged role in the 1MDB scandal.  Cineworld upgraded to top pick at RBC
JCDecaux raised to equal-weight at Morgan Stanley
Zalando upgraded to buy at DZ Bank
Remy Cointreau raised to market perform at Bernstein Asos downgraded to hold at Santander
Coface downgraded to hold at Kepler Cheuvreux
Nemetschek downgraded to reduce at Kepler Cheuvreux
Pfeiffer Vacuum downgraded to hold at HSBC IGTV featured video Information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary. 

JoeIG

JoeIG

Local market brief - APAC 18 Dec

Written by Kyle Rodda - IG Australia ASX yesterday: The ASX200 put in a very respectable day's trade yesterday. It was looking gloomy at the outset. Market participants were preoccupied with the economic struggles in China and the Friday sell-off on Wall Street. However, the 32-point drop forecast for the Australian market didn't materialise, providing scope for the index to cling-on to the 5600-mark, and forge gains throughout the day. The Australian session ended with the ASX200 1.00 per cent higher. It must be remarked that though positive, it was a day of light news and thin trade. The MYEFO release, coupled with BHP's share buyback and special dividend boosted sentiment, but volumes were quite some way below average, signalling a lack of conviction behind the day's rally. ASX today: The gains look quite certain to be unwound this morning, however. SPI futures markets are indicating a 90-point drop for the ASX200, taking us almost squarely to where we were ought to have opened yesterday morning. The Wall Street chaos appears an inescapable lead today. It'll be touched on in a moment, but US shares a copping a battering (again) to start the new week. Financials and growth-stocks might be the barometer today. The banks are receiving a belting, falling yesterday even within the market's overall rally. US tech is heading the losses on Wall Street, as are health care stocks, following a ruling by a Texas judge that Obamacare is illegal. Using recent history as a guide: this is a generally solid indicator that Australia's technology and health care space will be shorted today. Australian rates and bonds: Australian traders welcome the RBA Minutes this morning. Though probably ineffectual in the context of the day's trade, it will garner some attention from rates and currency markets, who are pricing in the prospect of a weaker Australian economy in the year ahead. Australian bonds are rallying once again on the prospect of a more accommodative RBA in 2019. The yield on 10 Year Australian Government Bond has fallen to 2.44 per cent, as break-evens in the bond market point to inflation languishing around 1.70 per cent moving forward. ASX 30 Day Interbank Cash Futures contracts have an implied probability of an RBA cut by mid next year at around 10 per cent, with any chance of a hike effectively non-existent now according to rates traders. The RBA Minutes: Markets will keep taking their cues from overseas developments to judge the macroeconomic outlook for Australia, given the concerns about a synchronised downturn in the global economy in the coming years. However, today's RBA's minutes will be perused for commentary on the strength (read: deteriorating state) of the Australian consumer. The MYEFO release yesterday forecast wages to grow at 2.5 per cent next year and 3.00 per cent the year after. Given the burden of high private debt levels, a narrowing savings rate and falling property prices, wages growth at the projected rates is unlikely to overcome such drags, meaning future slackness in domestic consumption is likely. It’s this is what is driving the bearishness towards the Australian economy, which risks being hit from both sides if weakness in domestic demand conspires with a marked slow-down in the Chinese economy. Australian macro: The problem of the Australian consumer is a medium-to-long-term matter for traders, and the RBA's Minutes will probably take a glass half full approach to the economy, as they are wont to do. The harsh realities of a weaker domestic demand will manifest over time in our markets, especially our embattled banks, which find themselves caught in the global bear market in financials stocks. The Australian Dollar ought also to remain in focus, primarily as concerns about Chinese growth raise issues about our terms of trade. The strength or weakness in the AUD rests on a combination of Fed policy and Chinese fiscal policy. If global-growth jitters persist, the A-Dollar as a risk-off growth- proxy currency should presumably suffer: the next key level of support is at 0.7150, before steep downside opens-up from there. Global indices: Coming into the last hour of Wall Street's session, things are looking bleak. If you're an investor or any other kind of equity market bull, you'd be nervous. If you're a bear, then you've experienced another day of vindication. The major European indices were down overnight: the DAX was off by 0.86 per cent and the FTSE100 by 1.05 per cent. US stocks have followed suit: after numerous failures to break-through, support on the S&P 500 and Dow Jones has been breached. The psychological barriers of 2600 and 24,000 have been cleared. Barring another miraculous final hour rally in US shares, the 2 major US indices are poised to register fresh lows at levels not clocked since early-April this year. Risk-off today: As can be assumed, it's risk-off wherever you look in global markets. US Treasuries have rallied - the US 2 Year Note is yielding 2.70 per cent and the US 10 Year note is yielding 2.85 per cent. The greenback has been sold consequently, giving the EUR a boost to 1.1350, and the Pound a lift to 1.2630. The Yen is back in the 112-handle as the carry trade unwinds, boding poorly for the Nikkei today. The Australian Dollar is steady against the greenback but weak mostly everywhere else. Gold has rallied to $1245 courtesy of the weaker USD, but oil has been smashed with WTI plunging below $50 on renewed fears of a glut. Spreads on junk bonds have blown-out subsequently, trading as wide as they have been for two-years. Ultimately, The action is culminating in an Asian session that shapes as another one for the Bears, as Santa's rally looks increasingly likely to be skipped this year.  

MaxIG

MaxIG

End of year FX swap rates - significant moves currently likely

Please be aware that due to year end market factors we are seeing significant moves in the funding rates for most FX pairs. This has been observed across the market, although some pairs are looking to be worse affected than others (most notably if you are short US dollars). These factors include financial institutions balancing their books before the end of the year, putting a strain on certain currencies. You can see overnight funding charges on FX pairs by using the link to the right. This is currently only available in desktop/web trading platform for leverage accounts. What does this mean for you Funding rates for FX pairs can be extremely volatile, resulting in your daily funding adjustments being much higher than normal. To the best of our knowledge this will affect JPY crosses held past 10pm on the 26th December, CAD crosses and USDTRY positions held past 10pm on the 28th December, and most other pairs including gold and silver held past 10pm on the 27th December.  As an example, for a normal 2-day roll charge on EURUSD you would receive 1.7pts for a short position and pay 1.79pts for a long position (+/- IG’s admin charge). Current rates are indicating receiving/paying 6 times these amounts should you hold your positions through year end snapshot dates, but these rates can change.  All things being equal, the FX tradeable price should adjust to reflect these rates but this is out of our control.  Where can I see expected overnight funding rates on FX positions? The funding rates shown on the platform are indicative and subject to change. 'Swap Bid' / 'Swap Offer' rates as shown below can be toggled on/off and show the expected rate for that day. I.e, to view what the expected rates you'll pay or receive on a currency pair at 10pm (GMT) would require you to check the specific currency row at any point on that same day (prior to 10pm). You can read more about that here.

JamesIG

JamesIG

Is a second referendum on the table? - EMEA Brief 17 Dec

Theresa May is coming under increasing pressure from MPs to stop the gridlock on Brexit negotiations. The pound is expected to see further volatility until at least mid-January as the unknown future of Brexit continues. The Dollar continued to trade at a 19-month high on Monday as concerns over slowing economic growth have reduced the appetite for riskier stocks and currencies and have backed the greenback as a safe-haven. The price of bitcoin has fallen below the cost to mine hitting a new low for the year of $3,126, loosing more than 80% since its ”tulip mania” phase at the end of last year. Without mining, bitcoin would cease to exist as it has no financial institution of Federal Reserve backing it up. The climate change talks held in Poland over the weekend have been said to end in success as the Paris accord of 2015 seems to have been reinforced. After China released lower than expected economic data on Friday, the Asian markets seem to be recovering as they enter the afternoon trading session, despite the Shanghai trading largely flat and the Shenzhen declining by 0.5%. The Nikkei 225 was up 0.8%, the Topix was up 0.3% and the ASX 200 was up almost 1%. Dow Jones futures indicate a slight recovery on the opening on Monday after all three major US indexes closed in correction territory on Friday. Asian overnight: A somewhat muted session overnight saw mixed fortunes within Asian, where the biggest outperformer came from the Australian ASX 200 index. The improved outlook for US-China relations helped drive mining firms higher yet in Australia, yet for the most part traders are somewhat cautious ahead of a critical week of central bank meetings. A quiet day ahead from an economic front sees a focus on elements such as the final eurozone CPI reading, alongside the US Empire state manufacturing survey. UK, US and Europe: As the British PM Theresa May seems to stand with her denial to allow for a second referendum on Brexit, MPs are now calling for a free vote in Parliament to allow them to decide on how they believe the Brexit gridlock should end. International trade secretary Liam Fox was the first Brexiter to publicly call for MPs to be allowed to vote on the future of Brexit after talks with the EU at the end of last week did not go as planned for Theresa May when EU leaders refused to amend the withdrawal agreement. The PM is expected to update MPs today regarding the outcome of her EU meetings last week. A cabinet meeting is expected to be held on Tuesday and ministers are likely to step up contingency plans for a no-deal Brexit. Economic calendar - key events and forecast (times in GMT) Source: Daily FX Economic Calendar 1.30pm – US NY Empire state mfg index (December): expected to fall to 21.5 from 23.3. Markets to watch: US indices, USD crosses Corporate News, Upgrades and Downgrades ASOS has issued a profit warning, saying that it had seen ‘significant deterioration’ in its trading in November, despite 14% sales growth in the September to November period. The firm has reduced its expectations as a result.  SSE has abandoned the proposed merger of its retail energy business with Innogy’s npower unit. Other options including demerger or outright sale are being considered.  Croda International has agreed to acquire Brenntag Biosector for €72 million. The firm serves the human and veterinary vaccine market.  Moncler upgraded to overweight at Morgan Stanley
Senvion upgraded to overweight at JPMorgan Dometic downgraded to hold at Kepler Cheuvreux
Zealand Pharma downgraded to neutral at Goldman
Salvatore Ferragamo downgraded to underweight at Morgan Stanley
Worldline cut to underweight at Morgan Stanley IGTV featured video Information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary.

DanielaIG

DanielaIG

Another Brexit reversal; a critical Fed decision; reverting to 'December' - DFX Key Themes

Another Week, Another Set of Brexit Scenarios It seems the weather patterns behind the Brexit seem to changing at a more rapid clip – always ending up back ‘in irons’ (pardon the nautical terminology) as the clock steadily winds down to the March 29 separation. This past week, was particularly momentous with the Prime Minister’s proposal supposedly going to vote in Parliament; but May decided to pull the vote before the allotted session as it was clear it would be voted down handily. And, considering the MPs had voted the week before to give themselves more power in the event the PM’s effort was rejected, she wanted to avoid losing any further control over the already stumbling process. The week wasn’t uneventful however as frustrated conservatives called a no confidence vote in May’s leadership. Ultimately, she survived the challenge and cannot be contested again for a year – though that doesn’t prevent further political pressure nor does it make navigating negotiations on the separation from the EU any easier.  It could have been the case that Juncker, Tusk and their European colleagues were waiting to see the outcome of the UK no-confidence vote to prepare further concessions that would warm May’s government; but that did not prove to be the case. After enduring the challenge, May attended to two-day European Community summit where Brexit and a no-deal outcome in particular were to be discussed. She received a clear rebuff on any further compromises from the EU and in fact had some features of the previous offer revoked. We have long ago passed the event horizon for a balanced deal to be struck such that the technical work would be ready by the actual separation date. It is unlikely that this is holdout from both or either side to earn further concession as the brinkmanship only adds to the economic and financial trouble down the line. That means this situation is more likely to continue unresolved until UK leadership makes the call.  If May can wrangle the conservatives to accept a temporary backstop, it may be the closest middle ground to be found. Alternatively, we will end up in either one of two extremes: a no-deal break or the call for a second referendum. If we end up with the former, it is more  likely to be pushed all the way to the predetermined end date. A second referendum however would likely be called weeks – perhaps even months – before the March 29 deadline. All the while as uncertainty prevails, external capital will continue to drain from the UK. Already with a default backdrop of uncertainty, global investors will want to avoid an overt threat like the Brexit. Further, domestic capital will increasingly be moved to safe guard rather than applied to more productive, growth-oriented means (such as business spending, property development, wage growth, etc). As has remained the case for some time now, trade Sterling cautiously and with a clear intent – if at all. A Critical Fed Decision to Set the Course of 2019  Top event risk over the coming week is the FOMC rate decision in my book. This final policy update of the year from the world’s largest central bank is one of the comprehensive events we expect on the quarters. Along with the routine update on rates and the monetary policy statement, this event will include the Summary of Economic Projections (SEP) and Chairman Jerome Powell’s press conference. First and foremost, the central bank is expected to hike rates 25 basis points for the fourth time this year to bring the range up to 2.25 to 2.50 percent. While Fed Fund futures project this outcome at a 77 percent probability – I would set the chances even higher. The Fed has established forward guidance as the primary tool for monetary policy even though it has raised rates at a steady pace and started to reduce its balance over the past year.  The utility of guidance is that it can acclimate the market to tangible policy changes before they are implemented to defuse the detrimental financial market volatility it could trigger otherwise. That is extremely important given the transitional phase global monetary policy is in following nearly a decade of emergency-level accommodation. Markets have grown more than accustomed to the support, the have grown somewhat dependent. Normalizing its essential to promote a healthy financial system, healthy risk taking and restore the buffer necessary to fight future downturns. Yet, if this fraught course is piloted poorly, a policy authority can inadvertently trigger the next crisis. Of course, if risk trends are already unsettled, a market that is seeking out threats could fixate on this disturbance readily enough. That said, the Fed may already be picking up on some strain in the economy and markets, looking to trim its pace so as not to run aground.  Preparing the market for that deceleration is just as important as setting expectations for its unrivaled hawkish drive over the past few years. Powell seemed to do start the adjustment a few weeks ago when the language in his speech on bonds seemed to denote greater caution and recognition of tension in the market. We have seen markets respond by  pulling rate forecasts via Fed Funds futures and overnight swaps down to only fully pricing in one 25 basis point hike – whereas previously the market had afforded three with debate of a fourth. We are due a definitive view for rate forecasts from the group in the SEP. The update for December showed a majority – by a single person – projecting three moves in 2019. Given how finally balanced that forecast was and the language from some key members, it is very likely to be downgraded. The question is whether a downgrade to just 2 hikes will then be construed as better-than-expected and if the tempo change will trigger concern amongst market participants about financial market health.  Was Italy Capitulation, Trade Concessions, A Brexit Vote Save Enough to Revert to ‘December Conditions’  Thus far, we have witnessed a remarkable December. Historically, this tends to be one of the most reserved months of the calendar year for volatility and volume which in turn translates to steady gains for traditionally risk-leaning assets. What we have seen instead is a continuation of the previous two months were high volatility has leveraged incredible swings in popular benchmarks like the S&P 500 and Dow while the VIX holds precariously high. It is inevitable that liquidity will hit holes over the coming weeks owing to market closures, but that doesn’t mean that the markets have to drift calmly into holiday conditions. Shallow market depth and high volatility can converge to produce extreme moves.  It is always wise to head into market closures or known liquidity contractions defensively, but that would be especially true of our current conditions. The question now is whether some relief on a number of ominous fundamental themes is enough to soothe the beast until markets fill back out in earnest when 2019 rolls in. Some points of progress optimistic bulls can point to include the agreement by China and the United States to a 90-day freeze fire on further escalation of tariffs, Italy softening its aggressive budget position and UK Prime Minister May surviving a no-confidence challenge. None of these developments are a long-term solution to the threats they represent, but it is breathing room at a time when the markets seem to need it most. Market biases can shift the response to events and themes – from exacerbating seemingly harmless issues into the foundation for true panic or quieting fear over a looming catastrophe. Ultimately, in conditions like these, hedges are worth it.

JohnDFX

JohnDFX

Dividend Adjustments 17 Dec Nov - 24 Dec

Expected index adjustments  Please see the expected dividend adjustment figures for a number of our major indices for the week commencing 17 Dec 2018. If you have any queries or questions on this please let us know in the comments section below. For further information regarding dividend adjustments, and how they affect  your positions, please take a look at the video.  NB: All dividend adjustments are forecasts and therefore speculative. A dividend adjustment is a 
cash neutral adjustment on your account. Special Divs are highlighted in orange. Special dividends this week Index Bloomberg Code Effective Date Summary Dividend Amount PSI20 COR PL 17/12/2018 Special Div 8.5 RTY PRA US 20/12/2018 Special Div 50 RTY HTLF US 20/12/2018 Special Div 5 RTY SYX US 21/12/2018 Special Div 650 RTY EVI US 24/12/2018 Special Div 13   How do dividend adjustments work?  As you know, constituent stocks of an index will periodically pay dividends to shareholders. When they do, the overall value of the index is affected, causing it to drop by a certain amount. Each week, we receive the forecast for the number of points any index is due to drop by, and we publish this for you. As dividends are scheduled, public events, it is important to remember that leveraged index traders can neither profit nor lose from such price movements. This information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary.  

MaxIG

MaxIG

2018 reaches a climax - APAC brief 17 Dec

Written by Kyle Rodda - IG Australia 2018 reaches a climax this week: It’s effectively the last serious trading week of the year, and the economic calendar reflects that. Indeed, there’ll be a handful of days between Christmas and New Years to keep across, but with little news and thin trade, it’s tough to imagine anything coming out of them. The markets are still ailing, with the bears firmly in control of price action. There’s so many risk-events coming up this week, traders with a bearish bias are surely salivating. They did well to knock-off US equities in the final round of last week: the S&P500’s 1.9 per cent loss on Friday ensured another down-week for Wall Street. How this year is remembered and how next year will begin will in no small way be revealed in the next 5 days: if you’re a financial markets buff, it’s exciting stuff. Economic data: Concerns about future global economic growth tightened its grip on market participants last week. A slew of fundamental data was released across numerous geographies on Friday, and most of it was quite underwhelming. European PMIs undershot expectations, probably attributable in a big way to the impact of being caught in the middle of several domestic political crises and the US-China trade war. US Retail Sales data printed very slightly above expectations, to the relief of many, showing that the almighty US consumer is holding up well – at least for the time being. But it was a very soft set of Chinese numbers that had the pessimists tattling: the spate of economic indicators released out of China on Friday afternoon proved once more it’s an economy that is slowing down – and hardly in a negligible way. Recession chatter: Market commentary is continually focused on what prospect exists of a looming US recession. Financial markets, as distorted as they have become, do not necessarily possess strong predictive power of economic slow-downs. Nevertheless, your pundits and punters have taken a significant preoccupation with whether 2019 will contain a global recession. The signs are there, at least in some intuitive way. A google trends search on the term recession has spiked to its highest point 5 years, for one. Bond markets are still flashing amber signals: the yield curve is inverting, and US break evens are predicting lower inflation. Equities are still moving into correction mode, demonstrating early signs of a possible bear market. Credit spreads are trending wider, especially in junk bonds, as traders fret about the US corporate debt load. And commodities prices are falling overall, with even oil still suffering, on the belief that we are entering a period of lower global demand. Economic data: Concerns about future global economic growth tightened its grip on market participants last week. A slew of fundamental data was released across numerous geographies on Friday, and most of it was quite underwhelming. European PMIs undershot expectations, probably attributable in a big way to the impact of being caught in the middle of several domestic political crises and the US-China trade war. US Retail Sales data printed very slightly above expectations, to the relief of many, showing that the almighty US consumer is holding up well – at least for the time being. But it was a very soft set of Chinese numbers that had the pessimists tattling: the spate of economic indicators released out of China on Friday afternoon proved once more it’s an economy that is slowing down – and hardly in a negligible way. Recession chatter: Market commentary is continually focused on what prospect exists of a looming US recession. Financial markets, as distorted as they have become, do not necessarily possess strong predictive power of economic slow-downs. Nevertheless, your pundits and punters have taken a significant preoccupation with whether 2019 will contain a global recession. The signs are there, at least in some intuitive way. A google trends search on the term recession has spiked to its highest point 5 years, for one. Bond markets are still flashing amber signals: the yield curve is inverting, and US break evens are predicting lower inflation. Equities are still moving into correction mode, demonstrating early signs of a possible bear market. Credit spreads are trending wider, especially in junk bonds, as traders fret about the US corporate debt load. And commodities prices are falling overall, with even oil still suffering, on the belief that we are entering a period of lower global demand. ASX in the day ahead: There are signs a general risk aversion is clouding the ASX to begin the week. SPI futures are pricing a 32-point drop for the Australian market this morning, which if realized will take ASX200 index through last Tuesday’s closing price at 5576. There has been the tendency for the market to overshoot what’s been implied on the futures contract of late, as fear and volatility galvanizes the sellers in the market. This being so, a new test of last week’s low of 5549 could emerge today, opening-up the possibility for the market to register a fresh two-year low. On balance, the day ahead looks as though it may belong to the bears, with perhaps the best way to judge the session’s trade by assessing the conviction behind the selling. Although it appears the less likely outcome, a bounce today and hold above 5600 would signify demonstrable resilience in the market.    

MaxIG

MaxIG

More Misery for May - EMEA Brief 14 Dec

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker stumped Theresa May's effort to renegotiate on a key Brexit withdrawal point, namely the Irish Backstop. China's reported industrial output and retail sales growth missed expectations. Industrial output growing by only 5.4% in November the slowest rate of increase in almost three years.  Asian Stocks fell as China's economy shows weakening. Shares in Hong Kong and Japan led declines, Japan Topix index sliding 1.5% and Shanghai Composite falling 1.5% Apple to push software updates in attempt to resolve potential court ban of some iPhone models in China resulting from alleged Qualcomm patent infringements.  COP24 UN Climate talks in Poland come to an end today but Former Maldives President Mohamed Nasheed warns there may be "hell to pay" if counties fail in taking significant steps in key climate issue agreements.  Bitcoin continues to decline as it approaches September 2017 level of $3,000.  Europe Car sales fell by 8.1% last month the third monthly decline in a row.    Asian overnight: Asian markets have failed to sustain the recent uptrend, with sharp losses overnight coming amid slowing Chinese data and a return of fears over Theresa May’s Brexit programme. Data-wise, the Japanese and Chinese economies have been in focus. The Japanese Tankan non-manufacturing index was the big outperformer, rising back to 24 after last month’s fall to 21. Chinese industrial production and retail sales both underperformed, although the blow was softened by a fall in the unemployment rate. UK, US and Europe: Looking ahead, a host of eurozone PMI surveys will keep the European session interesting as they are released throughout the morning. Also keep an eye out for the US retail sales figures before we return to the PMI focus for the US manufacturing and services PMI readings to close out the day. After rebuffing Theresa May's attempts to renegotiate or outline the Irish Backstop EU Leaders step up No-Deal Brexit plans. It appears once again that the EU is taking a hard stance in these divorce talks. This week has seen May experience highs and lows as Prime Minister. On Monday May was forced to cancel the parliamentary vote on the draft Brexit deal amid fears the Irish Backstop controversy would result in a no vote. Wednesday saw May survive a vote of no confidence but is this a small victory in the face of today's news?  Economic calendar - key events and forecast (times in GMT)   8.15am – 9am – French, German, eurozone PMIs (December, flash): German mfg PMI to rise to 52.3 from 51.8. Markets to watch: eurozone indices, EUR crosses

1.30pm – US retail sales (November): forecast to rise 0.2% MoM from 0.8%. Markets to watch: US indices, USD crosses Source: Daily FX Economic Calendar Corporate News, Upgrades and Downgrades Balfour Beatty expects performance to be above expectations after the sale of its infrastructure investments unit. The year-end order book is expected to be £12 billion, above last year’s £11.4 billion.  Reach said that performance for 2018 would be marginally ahead of forecasts, after Q4 revenue rose 23% following the acquisition of Express & Star.  Costco reported disappointing quarterly earnings and revenue resulting in shares fall of 3%.   Starbucks saw a 3% fall after hours, following the announcement of delivery service partnership with Uber Eats. Lundbeck upgraded to overweight at Barclays
Meggitt upgraded to buy at Citi Equinor Downgraded to Sell at Goldman IGTV featured video     Information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary.

MichaelaIG

MichaelaIG

A (relatively) settled session - APAC brief 12 Dec

Written by Kyle Rodda - IG Australia A (relatively) settled session: It’s been a soft day for global equities. With almost exactly two-hours to go in the US session at time of writing, another modest rally has apparently been faded by traders. Indications are that Wall Street will close lower. If proven true, this will punctuate a mixed day for Europe, and quite a solid day for the Asian region. The former found little impetus to be bid higher, while the Asian session showed the ebullience of diminishing trade tensions. Scanning the major indices, volumes were up compared to their 100-day average, however were slightly down when compared to their 10-day and 20-day average. It reveals a market that is more settled than what it has otherwise been seen during the global share-market correction – but remains vigilant and prepared to turn at the sight of bad-news. Global growth: Given price action in last night’s trade was relatively more subdued, traders and analysts seemed able to take the clearer air to reflect on current market drivers. The theme that’s popped up consistently in the last 24 hours can be crudely articulated as “downside risks to growth”. It was a theme adopted by ECB President Mario Draghi during his press conference following last night’s ECB Meeting; and it was also referenced by PBOC last night in relation to China’s economic fortunes. It bears repeating: October, November and December in markets have been characterizes by bearishness, of course. However, the causes throughout this period have shifted. What was initially a sell-off catalysed by fears regarding higher US interest rates has transformed into one driven by fears about slower global economic growth. ECB meeting: Last night’s headline event captures this well. The ECB met and broadly met traders’ expectations: rates were of course kept on hold, and the central bank’s QE program will come to an end. As always, the commentary and press conference were where the interest lay, and ECB President Draghi delivered a cautious but stark message. The balance of risks to the EU economy have shifted to the downside. The ECB lowered its forecasts for growth and inflation, even further below what could be considered objectively strong figures. Overall, President Draghi was judged as quite dovish about the prospects for European monetary policy. Though it was not stated explicitly – central bankers rarely communicate in such a way – the subtext of the speech strongly implied that any true policy normalization from the ECB is some way off.   Whatever it takes: It’s a fascinating conundrum for the ECB. After a decade of experimental monetary policy, on balance the central bank’s greatest endeavours haven’t seemed to work. President Draghi’s “whatever it takes” attitude has supported markets, but evidence for his success is scant. The counter-argument to this pessimistic take on the Eurozone and ECB always seems to go something like “yes, things aren’t good, but imagine how bad things could have if the ECB hadn’t done what it did!”. It could be a valid point – one better for the historians to take care of somewhere down the line. However, the situation is poised to be this: the global economy will eventually experience a recession, and the ECB will more-likely-than-not be at effectively negative interest rates. The whole affair engenders very little hope or confidence in the future of the European economy. The news flow: That reality considered, traders tipped their hat and gave a sympathetic nod to the ECB after its meeting, and more-or-less moved on. There wasn’t much bullishness to be found in markets last night, however it wasn’t a risk-off night either. A lot of commentary overnight has pointed to the trade-war being behind the session’s softness. China has reportedly detained another Canadian citizen on national security grounds, presumably in retaliation to Canada’s arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou. While on the other side of the world, members of the Trump administration declared that China ought to concede more to resolve the trade dispute. Overall, there was little substantial or game-changing revealed to markets – mostly just noise relating to the familiar and ongoing concerns that have been long-rattling markets. Today’s big Chinese data dump will be now be the one to watch. Not risk-off; but not risk-on: The price action communicated this reasonably well. US Treasury yields have stayed (fairly) still: the US 10 Year note held at 2.90 per cent, and the US 2 Year note dipped 1 point to 2.75 per cent, widening the spread there to 15 points. Wall Street is heading for a flat day, though with an hour to go in trade, the Dow Jones is a skerrick higher. The DAX and FTSE were both down 0.04 per cent. The greenback pushed-higher, mostly due to a weaker EUR, which fell to 1.1364. The Pound is up a skerrick, while the Yen, reflecting the day’s sentiment, fell slightly, just like gold, which is holding support above $US1240. The Australian Dollar is practically trading sideways at 0.7220. Credit spreads narrowed on the perception of diminished risk. And in commodities markets, copper is flat, and oil and iron ore rallied. ASX200 today: This is the context for Australian trading today, and with all of that digested, SPI futures are telling us we are set for a 14-point drop at the open for the ASX200. The ASX took the momentum generated by the improved sentiment about global growth yesterday, with the cyclical mining, consumer discretionary and industrial sectors some of the best performing. The rally lost legs throughout the day, as traders seemingly opted to fade the run once again. Volumes were high, but breadth was uninspiring. The foundations are set for another lower-high for the ASX200 index, reinforcing the notion the market is in some bearish down trend. Some contrary evidence suggests the worst is behind us: the RSI is still showing bullish divergence, and downside momentum is moderating. As it currently stands, a new low, as far above 5510 as possible, and/or a rally through resistance at 5705, is broadly the challenge the market needs to overcome to demonstrate evidence of a possible bullish turn in this market.

MaxIG

MaxIG

Theresa May survives, Second Canadian diplomat apprehended in China - EMEA Brief 13 Dec

Prime Minister Theresa May won a vote of no confidence in her leadership of the Conservative party last night. The results showed that Mrs May won the vote by 200 to 117, securing 63% of the total votes, she is now immune from any further vote's of no confidence for a year. GBP has fallen back from Wednesday's highs despite Theresa May successfully defending her leadership as investors believed she would win by a larger majority, the pound is currently trading at $1.2617 against the dollar. Several reports are suggesting that a second Canadian has been detained in China in what is believed to be a retaliation for the arrest of Huawei's CFO Meng Wanzhou, a spokesman said "we have been unable to make contact since he let us know he was being questioned by Chinese authorities". Asian equity markets ended positive on Thursday, the Hang Seng index was up slightly over 1%, Japan's Nikkei 225 rose 1.06% whist the Shanghai Composite increased by 1.3%. The US stock markets ended up following on from the positive performance in Asia. The Nasdaq rose 1% to 7,098.31, followed by a 0.64% increase in the Dow and the S&P 500 which climbed 0.54%. Gold remained steady, currently being priced at $1,244.46 per ounce. Asian overnight: Asian markets have enjoyed another positive session off the back of improving relations between the US and China. The pound enjoyed a bullish session after Theresa May managed to fend off the vote of no confidence with 200 votes. However, she still faces the same problem of passing a bill that has little support.  UK, US and Europe: Whats next for Mrs May after her victory in the vote of no confidence in her leadership last night? Pressure continues to mount as the Prime Minister now heads off to Brussels for an EU summit to seek concessions on the Irish backstop. EU leaders have already indicated that there will be no renegotiation on Brexit, however founder of G+ Economics, Lena Komileva, believes the chance of meaningful concessions "is actually quite strong". Having said this, Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg has said it was a "terrible result for the prime minister" and has called for her resignation, indicating a third of Tory MPs voted against her leadership.  Looking ahead, the Swiss rate decision from the SNB is joined by the ECB monetary policy decision. The question is whether Mario Draghi will allow the asset purchase programme to end despite ongoing worries about eurozone fiscal and economic stability.  Economic calendar - key events and forecast (times in GMT) Source: Daily FX Economic Calendar 12.45pm – ECB rate decision (1.30pm press conference): no change in policy expected, but with increased market volatility and a continuing stand-off with the Italian government dominating the news, the press conference may provide some insight about whether the bank is still confident about moving on rates later next year. Markets to watch: eurozone indices, EUR crosses 11.50pm – Japan Tankan large manufacturers index (Q4): index to rise to 22 from 19. Markets to watch: JPY crosses Corporate News, Upgrades and Downgrades Ocado said that revenue rose 12% to £390.7 million for the 13 weeks to 2 December, while average orders per week were up 13.1% to 320,000, but the average order size fell 1% to £104.91.  Serco expects earnings per share to be ahead of forecasts by 5-10%, thanks to a lower effective tax rate. Trading profit for 2018 and 2019 is expected to be in line with forecasts.   Bunzl said that it expects full-year revenue growth of between 8% and 9%, but a stronger pound was expected to hit performance.  Johnson Matthey upgraded to buy at HSBC
Pernod Ricard upgraded to hold at Liberum
WPP upgraded to buy at Shore Capital Elementis downgraded to hold at HSBC
Sabre Insurance cut to equal-weight at Barclays
Ultra Electronics cut to underweight at Barclay IGTV featured video Information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary. 

GeorgeIG

GeorgeIG

What’s making headlines - APAC brief 13 Dec

Written by Kyle Rodda - IG Australia What’s making headlines: There’s an hour and a half to go in the US session and global equities are up. Let’s assume they finish that way – there is plenty of room for clarification (and rationalization) late-on, if need be. Traders have taken the new green shoots in the trade-war and spun them into a positive narrative. Sure, the old green shots lay trampled below the new ones, but perhaps this time around the positivity will be given a chance to thrive. The other story hogging headlines in the financial press is the vote motion UK Prime Minister May’s leadership of the Tories. Market confidence has been shaken by that development, but as we wake-up this morning, the balance of opinion seems to be suggesting that May will win the day. The data side-show: Politics is driving markets still, which is always dangerous – it’s often a distortionary influence on prices rather than a revealer of fundamental facts. However, the fundamental economic data that was handed to traders overnight supported their optimism. Arguably the most significant release for the week, US CPI figures delivered a bang-on forecast number. If you’re a bull, locked in an environment where there exists fear of a global economic slowdown on one side, and fears about higher global interest rates on the other, a moderate outcome to any data-release is welcomed. Fundamental data last night was light otherwise, with US crude oil inventories the next most important release. It overshot forecasts, but still showed shrinking supplies, which boosted oil prices and (at the very least) didn’t detract from the bullish sentiment. ECB on tap: The next release on the data docket is the ECB meeting tonight. It’s that central banks last meeting for the year and ought to be watched, considering all this talk about slower growth and hawkish central bankers. Given the noise in markets and the gradual stagnation in the European economy, it’d be a might surprise if ECB President Mario Draghi and his team deliver any surprises. The situation across Europe is fraught with political, social and economic danger. No central banker is going to want to light a flame under all of that. Going into 2019, France is burning, Italy is agitating for change, the UK is still trying to bail, and the custodian of it all, Germany, is about to lose its steady hand in leader Angela Merkel. The politico-economic landscape doesn’t inspire much confidence in the grand European project, and the ECB will probably reflect that. Another faded rally? Nevertheless, as mentioned, traders are taking in their stride the ever-present risks in this market. (Stream of consciousness status update: US equities are giving up their gains with about an hour-and-a-half in trade to go, however they remain ahead for the day. Again, let’s check in on that later.) The core question at hand on bullish days is to what extent are rallies a reflection of market-reality or mere perception. US stocks have ended as of today its latest downtrend – another in a line of aggressive sell-offs and rallies within what is overall a sideways pattern since the middle of October. There must be scope for a break-out from this pattern at some point soon. The S&P500 eyes the 2800 again now: maybe we assess the strength of the bulls by their ability to return US stocks to that level again. ASX200: SPI futures are tracking Wall Street’s performance this morning, as they are wont to do, suggesting an open 5 to 10 points higher for the ASX200, at time of writing. The performance of Australian equities yesterday was solid, in line with major regional counterparts, as fears of trade-wars abated once again. Volume was ample at 15 per cent above average and breadth came-in just below 80 per cent. Each a sign of strong bullish conviction. It seems a desire to get into cyclical, economic-growth stocks constituted the essence of yesterday’s sentiment. The greatest activity was to be found in the materials, industrials and consumer discretionary stocks. Irrefutably, this is a good sign for the many who hold optimistic-enough views on global growth; the test will be whether this view can be vindicated leading into the end of the year. The seasonal kick? The success and failure of the ASX200 will be strongly correlated to what happens to US stocks for the rest of 2018. It figures: the core issues in the market relates to the ongoing strength of the US economy, and how hawkish the Fed may-or-may not be. There is probably an inherent disconnect on some scale of looking at our market through that lens. The ASX200 never truly saw the parabolic rise in prices that the major Wall Street indices did during the easy money era (Australians engineered a residential property boom instead). All the same, if seasonality is a guide, a December run higher is on the cards come the last half-of December. The measure of any run’s sustainability should roughly be assessed by the index’s ability to challenge levels at 5705, 5790 and 5880. Price-check: The North American session is nearly at its close. Time for a review on the price action. Wall Street is off its intraday high but has still managed gains over 1 per cent. The benchmark S&P500 is 1.2 percent higher. This backs-up a day in which the DAX and FTSE rallied 1.4 per cent and 1.1 per cent respectively. US 10 Year Treasury Yields are up to 2.90 per cent, and the yield on US 2 Year Note is up 2.77 per cent, widening the spread there to 13 points. Credit spreads have also narrowed. Higher risk appetite has seen the greenback sell-off. The DXY is at 97-flat, thanks in part to a Euro that’s fetching 1.1375 and a pound that’s buying above 1.26. Gold is slightly higher $US1245. The growth-optimism has boosted our AUD to just above 0.7225, while oil is up, and copper and iron ore are down.

MaxIG

MaxIG

New indicator: Volume Weighted Moving Average

This indicator emphasizes volume by weighing prices based on the amount of trading activity in a given period of time, where prices with heavy trading activity get more weight than prices with light trading activity. The VWMA has several advantages over a ‘simple’ WMA (which calculates an average of the closing price of ‘n’ number candlesticks giving the same weight to each one). With the volume weighted moving average (VWMA), the closing price of the day with the greatest volume gets a higher weight. On the IG charts you can turn on the VWMA on by right clicking on the chart itself and selecting ‘Volume Weighted Moving Average’ from the Indicator menu. Many traders use the VWMA and the simple WMA simultaneously. What does the VWMA tell us? As the VWMA is based around the volume, the gap between a ‘simple’ weighted moving average and a volume-weighted moving average shows the effect of volume weighting. This can be used to help with confirming trends or pointing out those trends that are weakening. If the VWMA stays below the WMA in a bullish market, it can be an indicator that the upward trend is lacking volume support and can signal a reversal in price. If the VWMA stays below the WMA in a bearish market, it can confirm a downward trend, signalling that a decline in price may continue. Graphic examples The green arrow indicates an area where the VWMA line has crossed from under the WMA, indicating that there could be a bullish trend coming in to play. When the price action is in an upward trend and it’s able to break through both averages then a bullish trend is thought to be confirmed. The red arrow indicates an area where the VWMA line crosses below the WMA line, indicating that a bearish trend could be forming. When the price in a downward trend and is able to break through both the averages then a bearish trend is thought to be confirmed. It’s important to keep in mind that when the VWMA is between the WMA and the price, there is a likelihood of the trend continuing in that direction. If the VMA line crosses over and positions itself between the VWMA and the price, it may be indicating a reversal is in place. These are only a few examples of how this indicator can be used. Feel free to leave your opinion and share your uses and examples for further discussion.  

DanielaIG

DanielaIG

China to cut US car tariffs from 40% to 15%- EMEA Brief 12 Dec

Asia stocks were higher Wednesday morning; Nikkei 225 rising over 2%, ASX 200 up by 1.25% and Hang Seng Index around 1.36%. This was followed by the news of China to cut US car tariffs from the planned 40% to 15%, the same tax charge on car imports from other countries May traveled on Tuesday back to Europe to try and gain a few more concessions from the European side, in regards to the Brexit deal. It is rumoured that 48 letters of no longer supporting May have been sent. May to face a vote of no confidence on Wednesday between 18:00 GMT and 20:00 GMT. Canada grants bail by setting a $10million CAD bail for Huawei CFO, Meng Wanzhou, following charges of “improperly taking payments from Iran in violation of sanctions against the country” EU Ambassador states that technology transfers should be regulated as EU companies should not be obliged to transfer technology to gain access to the Chinese market US President, Trump, announced that he would intervene in the case against Huawei CFO if this could contribute to closing a trade deal with China New charges are filed against Malaysian former Prime Minister, Najib Razak, and former CEO of 1MDB, in relation to alleged tampering of the audit report and theft of billions of dollars from the fund Trump comments on the expected rise in interest rates from the Federal Reserve as a “mistake”, as Trump needs the flexibility of lower rates to support the trade war between the US and China Saudi Arabia convinced two dozen oil producers to cut production levels as part of a “Saudi first” policy France budget deficit to potentially increase as President Macron announces a plan to raise minimum wage by 100Euros ($114) a month and overtime will not be taxed, as well as a reverse on tax hike on pensions for those earning less than 2000Euros a month UK government to spend an extra £100million to support the renewable energy projects in Africa, as well as committing to invest £5.8billion in international climate finance by 2020 Asian overnight: Asian markets have enjoyed a bullish session overnight, as improved sentiment over US-China relations is helping drive a more positive outlook for risk assets. A Chinese reduction in tariffs on US car imports looks like the first in many steps, while the US seem to be softening their stance to the Huawei CFO who has been granted bail in Canada. UK, US and Europe: Looking ahead, the eurozone industrial production release represents the only European event of note, while US CPI brings inflation issues back into the picture. Given the recent deterioration in energy prices, it comes as no surprise to see that the headline CPI reading is expected to decline this month. Finally, watch out for the crude inventories figure, which is expected to follow up last week’s surprisingly sharp decline with another negative reading this time around. It's also worth looking ahead at tomorrow, when the European Central Bank's president, Mario Draghi, is expected to confirm an end to QE (quantitative easing) in the form of 2.6 trillion euros worth of bond buybacks. The process, echoed by many central banks such as the US Fed and the Bank of England, has been hotly debated within the eurozone where more stable northern states didn't want to take on the political risk of weaker southern areas.  When it comes to energies, a warmer winter is expected to send LNG prices to a 6 month low, whilst forwards buying earlier this year - notably over summer - haven't helped. Whilst heating demand normally pushes the price action of energies up (as seen last year) it looks like some unsold cargoes are still looking for a home. Economic calendar - key events and forecast (times in GMT)  Source: Daily FX Economic Calendar 1.30pm – US CPI (November): CPI to rise 2.4% YoY from 2.5%, and 0.1% from 0.3% MoM. Core CPI to rise 0.2% MoM and 2.2% YoY. Markets to watch: GBP crosses
3.30pm – US EIA crude inventories (w/e 7 December): stockpiles to rise by 1.9 million barrels. Markets to watch: Brent, WTI Corporate News, Upgrades and Downgrades Rolls-Royce expects earnings and cash flow for the year to be at the upper end of previous guidance. The firm’s restructuring remains on target, it added.  British American Tobacco said that it was on track to meet targets, as performance in combustibles and vaping offset weakness thanks to FX markets.  Superdry has issued a profit warning, saying that warm weather in November and December had hit performance, although first half pre-tax profit rose to £26.4 million from £9.1 million a year earlier.  Deliveroo to open its first customer-facing restaurant in Hong Kong Brandlogic, a clothing brand, launched a legal claim against Bentley Motors, for “badly damaging its business” Facebook evacuating buildings in Silicon Valley due to bomb threat, but later found no explosives in the building Alfa Financial upgraded to hold at Berenberg
Rational upgraded to buy at HSBC
Siegfried upgraded to buy at Baader Helvea

DWS downgraded to underweight at JPMorgan
Man Group downgraded to neutral at JPMorgan
Salvatore Ferragamo cut to reduce at Kepler Cheuvreux
Metro Bank downgraded to neutral at Citi IGTV featured video Information has been prepared by IG, a trading name of IG Markets Limited. In addition to the disclaimer below, the material on this page does not contain a record of our trading prices, or an offer of, or solicitation for, a transaction in any financial instrument. IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of these comments and for any consequences that result. No representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. Consequently any person acting on it does so entirely at their own risk. Any research provided does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs of any specific person who may receive it. It has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research and as such is considered to be a marketing communication. Although we are not specifically constrained from dealing ahead of our recommendations we do not seek to take advantage of them before they are provided to our clients. See full non-independent research disclaimer and quarterly summary. 

KatherineIG

KatherineIG

The pattern continues - APAC brief 12 Dec

Written by Kyle Rodda - IG Australia The pattern continues: Wall Street indices have been swinging about madly again. The pattern continues: an open, a rally or fall, then a retracement or recovery. Today we’ve had an open, a rally, then retracement, then a recovery again. There were stories behind this price-action. Everything that happened overnight appeared perfectly explicable. One wonders though if the swings in trading activity are being overly attributed to headlines. Or perhaps it’s the case that higher volatility and sensitive nerves are leading to accentuated moves. Whatever the cause, fundamentally, the bears still have control of the equity market. There is a softer intensity to the selling on Wall Street this week. However, with the extremeness of last week’s moves having not been unwound yet, what we are seeing is sellers piling in on top of sellers, bit by bit. ASX200: SPI futures have turned positive, after oscillating wildly during the overnight session. That contract is indicating a 17-point jump for the ASX200 at time of writing. Yesterday was a tepid but respectable day for Australian shares, managing to muster a 0.4 per cent gain for the day. Volume was slightly above the 100-day average and breadth was okay. Growth stocks led the charge, following US tech’s gains the night prior, with the health care sector up 1.7 per cent, courtesy of a strong bid for CSL and ResMed. The materials space was the biggest points score for the index, adding 8 to the overall index’s performance. The trend is still down for the ASX200, as it is with global equity indices presently. However, yesterday’s daily candle, combined with a bullish divergence on the RSI, suggests some buyers are re-entering the market in the short-term, potentially offering temporary upside to ~5700. Headlines: Asia: Let’s look at the headlines in markets, to place what could be a mixed day for global equities into context – starting in Asia and following the turn of the globe. The Asian session was data-dry and lacking in the way of algo-shaking headlines. The resignation of India’s head central banker was meaningful but failed to move the dial outside of India’s markets. Australian business confidence was released and revealed softening sentiment in the sector. China released money supply data and that revealed stimulus from policy makers is filtering through the economy. Japan had a long-term bond auction that demonstrated how lower global yields is affecting appetite for government bonds. The major stock indices were up, in sympathy with Wall Street, except for the Nikkei, which was lower largely due to a stronger Yen. Headlines: Europe: Europe handed more information to investors; and it was a very solid day for European equity markets. European Commission President Jean Claude Juncker poured water on any notion of refining the existing Brexit deal. He started that “There is no room for negotiation, but further clarifications are possible”. UK Prime Minister Theresa May met with German Chancellor Angela Merkel to discuss massaging the deal, only (in a comical display of cosmic irony) to become briefly locked inside in her German car at the doorstep of the meeting, before (figuratively speaking) being turned away by Chancellor Merkel. The fundamental data released in the UK was positive, though. The unemployment rate was shown to have held strong at 4.1% last month; and wage growth climbed by more than forecast to 3.3 per cent.  Headlines: North America: The US is where all the news and therefore volatility is being made, and last night’s session delivered on that front again. The day’s outset was defined by news the Chinese are willing to lower auto-tariffs on US cars from 40, to 15 per cent. Industrials (auto makers in particular) rallied. Sentiment turned after a combative meeting between Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer and US President Donald Trump raised the prospects of a government shut-down if funding for the President’s border wall wasn’t passed through congress. US Vice-President Mike Pence was there too, but he was busy pulling his I’ll-sit-silently-and -look-like-the-next-President face. Behind the reality T.V. show that is US politics, US economic data was solid, albeit ineffectual: US PPI beat estimates, but all eyes are on tonight’s US CPI data. Snapshot of price (re)action: As of an hour to go in the US session, and with sentiment swinging back into the favour of the bulls again, the described news played out in prices like this. Risk appetite was generally higher. US Treasury yields ticked-up across the board: the US 10 Year note is yielding 2.86 per cent and the 2 Year note is yielding 2.77 per cent, narrowing the spread there to just below 10 points. As was implied earlier, the DAX and FTSE both rallied in European trade, by 1.5 and 1.3 per cent respectively. US credit spreads have narrowed. The US Dollar is flexing its muscles, rallying above 97.40 according to the DXY, as the EUR hangs onto the 1.13 handle and the Cable eyes a plunge below 1.25. Typical anti-risk assets, Gold and the Yen, are slightly lower, while the AUD holds onto 0.7200. And in commodities, copper, iron ore, and oil are higher on growth optimism. Finding some meaning: Let’s finally try to put a ribbon on things. Going out on a limb: stocks look likely to close higher on Wall Street. So now for a few cursory takeaways from what’s been gathered from the start of the week. CPI tonight will colour this view, but traders are concerning themselves less with Fed-hikes and more with long term growth prospects. Activity in the yield curve last night probably attests to this. Rightly or wrongly, the trade-war is being judged the major threat to economic growth. Breakthroughs in this story last night injected the bullish sentiment into markets. The Huawei story is being ignored for now, which perhaps reveals that US and Chinese policy makers will bite their tongues just to get a deal done. These are good signs for bulls, but as is well understood, these things can turn very quickly. The question worth considering is whether a de-escalating of the trade-war will do anything to arrest the global economic slow-down. The risk is, the damage is done; or perhaps even worse, there are even bigger forces at play stifling growth. The-trend-is-your-friend, as the cliché goes, and the trend is pointing to downward momentum in markets. Markets are a huge beast, and cycles move like turning ships. For now, the corrective and bearish price action across asset classes indicates the end of a cycle of some description. Until there are signs of definitive change – that is, a rebalancing from bearishness to bullishness – the matter for equity markets is this: is what we are seeing an uncomfortably but relatively benign retracement within the broad, post-GFC trend-channel; or are these signs that in 2019 and beyond, we are entering a true (perhaps recessionary) bear market?

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