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The pull-back is here - APAC brief 23 Jan
The pull-back is here: The pull-back markets were waiting for – the one we inevitably had to have – has arrived. It’s risk-off across financial markets and the optimism that drove global stocks off their December lows has subsided. Relatively speaking, it’s been a day of significant downside, but nothing yet to warrant tremendous fear. It should be common knowledge, but it bears repeating: proper validation that global equities have truly established a recovery ought to be judged not by the latest high, but by where markets form their next low. The retracement which is apparently upon market participants now hands a golden opportunity to judge this market for what it truly is – have the bulls reclaimed their dominance, or have the bears lulled them into a trap, and now stand poised to assert further downside?


The market’s rationale: A greater look at this subject and Wall Street’s price action later. In relation to the overnight sell-off, the rationale was as feeble as the one that got stocks to their recent peaks in the first place. It’s been chalked up to reduced positivity towards the trade-war, and renewed concerns about global growth. To begin with, very little data throughout the past week has provided a clear and substantial picture on economic growth. The boost in sentiment has come from geopolitical or monetary policy developments that was assumed to be supportive of the growth outlook – at some point in the future.  Some nice-noises made between the US and China in trade negotiations here, and a few dovish comments from a handful of US Fed speaker there, is what ignited the latest part of the risk-on rally.
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Gloomy Days Ahead as IMF Cuts Global Forecasts - EMEA Brief 22 Jan
The IMF has cut its forecasts for growth as it says the global economic expansion is losing its momentum, projecting a 3.5% growth rate worldwide for 2019, 0.2 percentage points less than its forecasts in October. This comes just hours after China announced its slowest economic growth in almost three decades.
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Bullishness settles - APAC brief 22 Jan
Bullishness settles: The ASX200 was sold into the close on a day where the market's bullishness stalled. Nevertheless, the index ended the day in the green, adding 10 points. It's a very headline driven market currently, and the finger is being pointed to news that the US and China are squabbling over intellectual property protections as the cause for the cooler sentiment. US markets were closed for the Martin Luther King Day public holiday, so the lack of tradeable information probably hindered the market too. But almost universally yesterday, financial markets traded on markedly lower activity. The ultimate result was an overall down day for stocks, a mixed day for bonds, a tinge of a bid for safe-haven currencies, while commodities were higher underpinned by well-supported oil prices.

ASX set for flat start: SPI futures are positioned for the ASX200 to open flat-to-very-slightly-higher come today's open. It's a resilient market at present, with the trend line derived from recent lows looking clean and dutifully respected. The bulls guided the-200 above the 5900-mark for the first time in roughly two months yesterday. As widely expected, the market met resistance at the index's 200-day EMA around 5909 during intraday trade, registering a daily high only a skerrick above that point. Yesterday’s daily candle indicates one slightly more vulnerable to bearish control in the very short-term: the sellers overwhelmed the buyers into the back end of the day, bringing about a close in the green, but well-off the day's high.
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Dividend Adjustments 21 Jan - 28 Jan
Please see the expected dividend adjustment figures for a number of our major indices for the week commencing 21 Jan 2019. If you have any queries or questions on this please let us know.
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Trade wars improving?, topics for Davos, Brexit timelines - DailyFX Key Themes for the EMEA region
"As of Monday, the countdown will drop to 67 days until the UK is due to leave the European Union according to the two-year timeline dictated by Article 50."
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Chinese Growth Lowest in 28 Years - EMEA Brief 21 Jan
Chinese growth has officially fallen to its slowest in 28 years. Fourth quarter figures have been announced which confirm analysts’ expectations that growth would be 6.4%, averaging 6.6% for the year.

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The bulls are coming back: APAC brief 21 Jan
The bulls are coming back: Traders received the greenlight to jump into risk assets on Friday. It culminated in a substantial jump across global equities and a certain “risk-on” attitude to trading. The impetus was arguably more technical than fundamental. The boost in sentiment in being attributed mostly the leaked news that Treasury Secretary Stephen Mnuchin was planning to lift US tariffs on China. Whatever the motive, nefarious or simply untrue, that story was quickly denied by the White House. However, it signalled enough to the market that progress was being made in trade war negotiations. That extra fuel to this recovery’s fire supported a push above very significant technical levels in Wall Street indices, attracting buyers and further validating the view that the December sell-off is behind us.

The stock market’s biggest fan: There’s one market participant who is apparently willing that notion to be true: US President Donald Trump. The US President obviously uses the stock market’s performance as a measure of his success – rightly or wrongly. And over the weekend, amidst the very many Tweets that were Tweeted by Trump, this one outlined his view on the US economy and stock market: “the Economy is one of the best in our history, with unemployment at a 50 year low, and the Stock Market ready to again break a record (set by us many times)…” Quite a pledge to make – and one markets participants aren’t going to take too seriously. Regardless, it does provide a perversely comforting story for markets, to know that the US President is wishing this market higher.
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What's wrong with predictions?
Join the IG conversation on Community. "There's lots of talk about 'the smart money' banks, institutions, pension funds and the like but not much about the others side of the coin, 'the dumb money', why is that - it's because they just aren't influential to the market. The collective size of the dumb money is dwarfed by the big money to the point of being irrelevant."
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Stranger Things Have Happened: Netflix Earnings and More – EMEA Brief 18 Jan
Netflix announced subscriber growth of 8.8 million over the past year giving them a total of more than 139 million. Meanwhile, their quarterly revenue was up 27% from the same period in 2017 but the share price is down 3% as they failed to hit analysts’ expectations.
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Mixed trade - APAC brief 18 Jan
Mixed trade across the globe: Global equity indices have traded mixed in the last 24 hours. Asian trade was soft, European trade was poor, while US indices look as though they will deliver another day in the green. This may not be such a bad thing: perhaps the differing performance across regional indices is a sign of a more discerning market place. Panic about the global economic landscape has subsided for now, allowing traders to take a more nuanced view of the asset class. There is a degree of divergence happening again between US equities and the rest of the world – though it must be said the ASX is still following the lead of Wall Street. Optimism about fundamentals in the US is progressively being restored; that of the rest of the world is still in doubt.


US macro-outlook apparently strong: The notion the US economy is still on solid footing was supported by strong economic data last night. Both unemployment claims and the Philly Fed Manufacturing Index beat expectations, boosting confidence that the labour market and business activity is strong in the US. As has been repeated many-a-time throughout the recent stock-market funk, economic fundamentals could well be secondary or tertiary to other forces previously supporting equity markets.
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May Day: Theresa survives but for how long?
Theresa May's government holds onto power, winning a no-confidence vote in parliament last night by 325 votes to 306. The Prime Minister has now set out to reach a cross-party solution for Brexit, although this will be extremely difficult as the PM was snubbed by the leader of the opposition last night saying that she is in charge of a "zombie government".
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Bullishness rolls on - APAC brief 17 Jan
Bullishness rolls on: The bullish correction in financial markets continues, and global equity markets are rolling on. It’s a matter of contention as to why this rally hasn’t been faded, just in the short term. Stocks were oversold on a technical basis, and the market internals were very over-stretched at the deepest trough of the recent sell-off. An elastic band effect was expected – a brief snap back in to place. Perhaps complacency will bite at some stage, and the rally in risk-assets will prove a mere counter-trend. Analysing the price-action however, the buyers are controlling the market. Keys levels in several major share-indices have been tested and breached. Yes, without overwhelming conviction, but the technical breaks of resistance are there. One must respect the will of the market.

Fear falling, confidence rising: Substance in the move higher is lacking, just at present. Fundamental justifications are emerging, though not in such way yet that justifies out-right bullishness in this market. Earnings season in the US has gotten off to a good start, with bellwether banks beating analyst forecasts thus far, and the overstated effects of Brexit have been contained. The meaty part of reporting season is still ahead of us, so evidence US corporates are in a better than expected shape remains wanting. The simple explanation for why market participants are more confident now is that they believe policymakers have their back. Separating the philosophical arguments about whether that ought to be proper reason to take-risk, invest and trade in a financial market, for self-interested traders, that’s enough of a cue to buy-in now.
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#IGBrexitChat - submit your questions to our panel - EMEA trading session
We have a live #IGBrexitChat broadcast today at 13:00 GMT to follow up on market movements and potential trade opportunities. Submit your questions to our panel now!
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Double defeat: Will May survive no confidence vote?  - EMEA Brief 16 Jan
May's Brexit deal rejected by 230 votes making may's defeat the biggest in UK history of sitting governments. The no vote saw the GBP rise 0.05% to $1.28. As a result of the landslide defeat May is to face vote of no confidence, the vote is expected to be held at 19:00 GMT.

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The Brexit-vote fall-out - APAC brief 16 Jan
ASX’s looming recovery: The ASX200 has clawed itself to a level on the cusp of validating the notion that the market has bottomed. It might feel that we ought to already be at that stage, given we sit 7-and-a-half per cent of the markets lows. But turnarounds take time to be confirmed, and now having broken psychological-resistance at 5800, Australian equities are inches away from that point. There are counterarguments to be made, to be fair: the recent rally has come on the back of lower volumes, and the buyers have lost a degree of momentum. Nevertheless, the capacity to push beyond 5800, and then when the time comes, form a new low when the inevitable short-term retracement arrives, would give credence to the “market-recovery” narrative.

ASX today: SPI futures this morning is pointing to a gain on 7 points at the open, at time of writing. There are several risks that could undermine that outlook. As the laptop’s keys are being tapped, there is 2 hours left to go on Wall Street, and the UK Parliament have just begun the process to vote on UK Prime Minister May’s Brexit Bill. More on that later. ASX bulls today will be searching for a solid follow through from yesterday’s 0.71 per cent gain. The daily candle on the ASX200 chart showed a market controlled by buyers from start to finish: the market never dipped below its opening price, and it finished by leaping to a new daily (and 2-month high) at the close.
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Post in Brexit Countdown
It's a big day for UK and EU politics, but how will that play into market volatility? Discuss options on IG Community and plan your trading strategy. "Possible affect on eurgbp and gbpusd of the different scenarios possible on the 'deal' vote today and beyond..."
The meaningful vote: not-so-bad outcome or disaster? - EMEA Brief 15 Jan
Crude oil bounced higher overnight after a free-fall since Friday. WTI floated past $51.50 a barrel, after gaining 1.29%, as the markets struggle to balance out the OPEC production cuts with concerns over global growth and increased US production. 
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A (shallow) sea of red - APAC brief 15 Jan
A (shallow) sea of red: There is a lot of red across the board for global equity indices to start the week, but the extent and strength of the downside swings have so far proven quite benign. The theme dominating markets yesterday and overnight was that of slower global growth. It kicked-off more-or-less following the release of some abysmal Chinese trade figures, that added further concern that the Chinese, and therefore global economy is heading for a significant slow-down. The data sparked a generally bearish mood in global markets, prompting a bid-higher in traditional safe-haven assets. At time of writing, the JPY is up along with gold, equities are down, copper is off, commodity-currencies like the A-Dollar has dipped, while bond prices are relatively steady.

A still quiet day: The VIX index jumped at the start of day’s session but is paring its gains. It remains below the 20 level still – far from its lofty December heights. Concerns about slower global growth is the theme as mentioned, however it’s not rattling trader nerves right now as much as it might have in the recent past. Activity has also been thin. Volumes in every major share market were markedly below average. The swings we have seen in prices too are very modest compared to what one might expect in a market still inhibited (somewhat) by thin holiday liquidity. Global growth is a major headwind, markets are sure of that. However, the behaviour of traders could just as readily be attributed positioning ahead of several weeks of event risk and possible uncertainty.
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Dividend Adjustments 14 Jan - 21 Jan
Please see the expected dividend adjustment figures for a number of our major indices for the week commencing 14 Jan 2019. If you have any queries or questions on this please let us know in the comments section below. For further information regarding dividend adjustments, and how they affect  your positions, please take a look at the video.
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Trade war hopes; US government shutdown; key Brexit vote - DailyFX Key Themes - EMEA and Americas
We are just over 75 days away from the official date that the United Kingdom is due to separate from the European Union. If all that was necessary was to come to terms with an agreement between the two parties on their relationship post-split, this would perhaps not be so frightening...
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Clouds Loom as Chinese Economy Falters - EMEA Brief 14 Jan
Asian stocks fell as China's export data indicated a shock contraction, declining by 7.6% since July 2016. This points to deepening cracks in the world's second largest economy and increased fears of a significant slowdown in global growth and businesses. 

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Global stocks - APAC brief 14 Jan
Global stocks: Global equities will be forced to prove their mettle this week. Price action suggests that for many equity indices, the market is ambling at a cross-road. The macro-economic challenges moving markets in general haven't been resolved. That remained true during last week's trade, which saw global stocks move higher, in general. The difference this week is there are more numerous and higher impact risk-events that could make or break the stock market's recovery. There will be no shortage of potential catalysts to move markets, in the short term, into its next phase. Opportunity for both upside and downside exists. Though given the one-way run experienced on Wall Street, perhaps it should be judged that the risk is skewed slightly to the downside, for now.

US market’s cross-roads: The will of the Bulls was under scrutiny in the latter part of last week. The lingering question has yet to be answered: are we experiencing a recovery, or will this be a faded rally? The S&P500 couldn't manage to break the big-psychological resistance level of 2600. The bulls appeared to simply stall on Friday, with the US market according to the S&P500 closing a very narrow 0.01 per cent lower. Friday's trade amounted to the only negative session for the major-US stock index for the week. The upside-momentum is apparently waning for US equities. The VIX is lower it must be stated, so fear is diminishing in the market. But perhaps confidence is still rattled somewhat by December's market-rout.
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Using IG alerts to identify trading opportunities
We have different alerts for every type of trader, from the technical analyst to the long-term investor. See which ones will work for you and review some possible use cases to help you identify trade opportunities.
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Will the New Year Blues continue? - EMEA Brief 11 Jan
Yesterday saw further pessimism from corporate giants as the likes of Jaguar Land Rover, Macy's Inc and BlackRock Inc cut profit forecasts.
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Sentiment cooling - APAC brief 11 Jan
Sentiment cooling: Sentiment is cooling and the drivers that have sustained global equity's recovery are subsiding. It's no cause for alarm (yet) by any means. The markets are demonstrating a level of short-term exhaustion after its chaotic December. The same risks remain; traders have just shifted their views. The concerns regarding a slow-down in global growth have abated somewhat, though the issue is still simmering. The outlook for how the Fed will approach policy is being judged as more-dovish, however it remains an ambiguous matter. The US and China appear to be pushing for a trade-deal, but it's known that it will be a protracted process to arrive at one. The US government shut down is down the list of worries for markets for now, although it is gradually gaining greater significance.

ASX200’s crossroads: SPI futures are currently indicating a modest jump of 5 points for the ASX200 at the open. The conviction for Aussie-market Bulls will be tested today. The ASX200 stands before a reasonably significant wall, that if climbed, goes some way to validate that it's recent rally is more than a counter-trend. The zone between 5780 and 5800 has proven a marshy resistance area in the last two-days. The Bulls have done well to push the market through prevailing downward trend-line resistance, but now a meaningful push through 5800 is required to confirm the move higher. After a lukewarm day, the ASX managed to close at 5797, courtesy of a somewhat inexplicable 0.3 per cent jump in the index's price in the post-market auction.
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