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Is it just me, or am I the only one who thinks it's time to suspend all market trading for 3 weeks? It would appear that the only way is down, there is no cohesive policy from the worlds central banks (only partisan moves designed to serve local economies) which are being over run by the sheer power of the world's markets. Combine that with the most pointless oil price war ever (who pumps more oil in a shrinking market? So much for supply and demand or flood the demand according to MBS and Vladimir Vladimirovich, which upsets mostly US producers). The most sensible policy surely is to suspend the markets until we have a clearer understanding of exactly what is going on and resume markets when clearer, saner more rested minds prevail. China did not hesitate to do so and so avoided  full on  market capitulation.  Why are we not taking the cue? Suspend markets now, before a rout becomes total annihilation. Give governments and central bankers time. Give traders time. Let the market breathe. Or is it just me?

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Invoking the now famous words of former ECB chief Mario Draghi to do “whatever it takes” to save the euro, Schnabel said the ECB stood ready to do everything within its mandate to counter market turmoil, a message aimed at halting a massive selloff in debt markets.

https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-ecb-policy/ecb-ready-to-do-everything-it-takes-to-counter-turmoil-schnabel-idUKKBN2150W2?il=0

 

And if you're stuck with an open short - you'll lose your money.  100% guaranteed.

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53 minutes ago, dmedin said:

I've made money shorting (almost made back all the money I lost since I started in 2018), but I still feel like cr@p.  If it takes events like these to make money then ... maybe it's not worth it?  Well let's see what happens.

I understand that pal.  I too have have doubt while shorting for the same reason; like I'm adding to the problem and bringing it all down...But it's a house of cards anyway....maybe it needs a strong breeze to rebuild it.....

the economy can't continue.  2008 happened and it's taken 12years for anyone to realise.  

Either way, you've done well to get your coin back.    I've literally made a 20% loss on my account again.  Old habits of not following Trends (as discussed here).  Even now on the FTSe, i keep giving it back expecting it to bounce and return to Resistance.....Everytime it takes another sum....

A reset is still good though.  Time to find the bottom on a few good stock.  I've a watchlist in place.

Edited by nit2wynit
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Market shutdown will not change things, will be the same as a limit up or down - orders will still be place it's won't change the sentiment. What people don't realise this was setting up since 2009 - it's not virus related, news and economist alike are using it as a convenient scapegoat.

See the short covering on ES YM that's only rollover March to June and a 50% retracement still want to go to 2015/16 highs

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21 minutes ago, PitTrader said:

Market shutdown will not change things, will be the same as a limit up or down - orders will still be place it's won't change the sentiment. What people don't realise this was setting up since 2009 - it's not virus related, news and economist alike are using it as a convenient scapegoat.

See the short covering on ES YM that's only rollover March to June and a 50% retracement still want to go to 2015/16 highs

This^

The world Capitalist Globalist economy failed well before 2008....it's just took that long for it to effect.....that last 12 years is the delayed reaction.

It needs to come to an end!

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11 hours ago, 786Trader said:

Is it just me, or am I the only one who thinks it's time to suspend all market trading for 3 weeks? It would appear that the only way is down, there is no cohesive policy from the worlds central banks (only partisan moves designed to serve local economies) which are being over run by the sheer power of the world's markets. Combine that with the most pointless oil price war ever (who pumps more oil in a shrinking market? So much for supply and demand or flood the demand according to MBS and Vladimir Vladimirovich, which upsets mostly US producers). The most sensible policy surely is to suspend the markets until we have a clearer understanding of exactly what is going on and resume markets when clearer, saner more rested minds prevail. China did not hesitate to do so and so avoided  full on  market capitulation.  Why are we not taking the cue? Suspend markets now, before a rout becomes total annihilation. Give governments and central bankers time. Give traders time. Let the market breathe. Or is it just me?

You assume what is happening is not by design.....on the surface your advice and reasoning is sound......

But underlying it all is the fallacy that it was working OK in the first place.

The gains represent the absolute corruption of the world.....  The only way the Indices figures could be true is if we were all wealthy and secure.......and clearly, we're not.

the world is imbalanced by not only Capitalism, but the corruption of Capitalism in light of Fiat Currency and a non- Gold backed system..

Globalism cannot go on......It's quite simple on paper!.

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there has been many examples of the sock exchange being suspended for days through time like September the 11th,during war other diseases etc,how low could the markets go for someone like trump or others to take the decision to suspend for good?

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On 22/03/2020 at 23:11, underg said:

there has been many examples of the sock exchange being suspended for days through time like September the 11th,during war other diseases etc,how low could the markets go for someone like trump or others to take the decision to suspend for good?

A market suspension makes sense only for the short term (max one month).Market sentiment will return only when there is a strong feeling that the virus had been controlled. To keep markets open in this slow motion car crash of volatility is only encouraging more uncertainty and panic. 

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